Work stress raises risk of premature death in vulnerable men - study

Men with diabetes or heart disease under ‘job strain’ have 68% higher risk of early deathA major study into the impact of work stress on health has revealed dramatic differences in the rates of premature death between different groups of men, and between men and women, depending on existing medical conditions.Doctors found that men with diabetes, heart disease, or who had previously suffered a stroke, were 68% more likely to die over the course of the study if they had demanding jobs with little control over their workload.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health Science Diabetes Mental health Heart disease Medical research Men's health & wellbeing Work-life balance careers Source Type: news

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(Natural News) Even though Type 2 diabetes (T2D) was previously regarded as a disease that usually affected older individuals, the global epidemic of obesity has seen diagnoses soar among young adults, adolescents and even in young children. According to a study, “the earlier a person is diagnosed with T2D, the higher their risk of death from heart disease...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 16 October 2018Source: Journal of Clinical NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Shengbang Zheng, Baodong YaoAbstractRisk factors for first-ever stroke have been studied extensively, while those for recurrent stroke are not accurately understood. To provide the adequate secondary prevention for the patients, it is necessary to reveal the risk factors that dominate recurrent stroke. Multiple databases were adopted to search for the relevant studies and full-text articles involving in the risk factors for stroke recurrence were reviewed. Meta-analyses were performed with Review Manager 5.0 to estimate the...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news
Authors: Michas G, Karvelas G, Trikas A Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a significant and ever-growing problem in Europe, accounting for nearly 45% of all deaths and leading to significant morbidity. Greece is one of the European Union member states that top the list of deaths due to ischemic heart disease and stroke, a fact that is mainly attributed to unfavorable changes in modifiable risk factors. The aim of this review is to examine the latest evidence on the most important CVD risk factors. According to studies conducted during the last two decades, the prevalence of arterial hypertension, hypercholes...
Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: Hellenic J Cardiol Source Type: research
This article is part of a series of opinion pieces to mark World Food Day October 16   José Graziano da Silva is Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United NationsThe post Zero Hunger: our actions today are our future tomorrow appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations World Food Day 2018 Source Type: news
Authors: Smith-Palmer J, Boye KS, Perez-Nieves M, Valentine W, Bae JP Abstract Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a leading morbidity and mortality in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Previous studies have shown geographic differences in the prevalence of CV and renal diseases. A literature review of longitudinal (≥5 years) studies including ≥1000 T2DM patients and reporting CV endpoints was performed to compare risk profiles. Key differences between geographies included a relatively higher prevalence of microalbuminuria in East Asian relative to North American and European patients, which in turn is an important CV risk ...
Source: Expert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
Those of you following these Wheat Belly and Undoctored Blog posts know that it is no secret that Big Pharma is a predatory, manipulative, cutthroat industry that employs underhanded and unethical tactics as routine business. Part of their huge economic success is that they are so effective in getting my colleagues, mainstream physicians, to drink their Kool-Aid and do a lot of the dirty work for them. Just witness what happened in the opioid crisis—it couldn’t have happened without the willing participation of physicians. It’s no different with “treating” cholesterol, total and LDL, with stat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates cholesterol LDL lipoproteins low-carb small ldl undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Authors: Ninomiya T Abstract The Hisayama Study is a population-based prospective cohort study designed to evaluate the risk factors for lifestyle-related diseases, such as stroke, coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and dementia, in a general Japanese population. The prospective follow-up surveys have been conducted in subjects aged 40 or older since 1961. Notable characteristics of this study include its high participation rate (70-80% of all residents aged 40 or older), high follow-up rate (99% or over), and high autopsy rate (approximately 75% of deceased cases). The Hisayama Study has provided valu...
Source: Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: J Epidemiol Source Type: research
This article, unfortunately paywalled, is interesting to note as a mark of the now increasingly energetic expansion of commercial efforts in longevity science. David Sinclair has been building a private equity company to work in many areas relevant to this present generation of commercial longevity science; while I'm not sold on his primary research interests as the basis for meaningful treatments for aging, he is diversifying considerably here, including into senolytics, the clearance of senescent cells demonstrated to produce rejuvenation in animal studies. This sort of approach to business mixes aspects of investing and...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
TYPE 2 diabetes can increase the risk of developing heart disease if the blood sugar condition is not controlled properly. If you have diabetes, how can you lower your risk of complications such as heart attacks and strokes?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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