Seeking trifecta against kidney disease, biotech team line up $150 million IPO

They built and sold Ilypsa and Relypsa, now this team is prepping their latest company to ask the FDA to approve another drug for chronic kidney disease patients.
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news

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Conclusion: This study suggests that a higher OBS is associated with more favorable levels of IL-6 and CRP, and that the association of OBS and IL-6 may be modified by CKD status.Nephron Extra 2018;8:11 –23
Source: Nephron Extra - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/24 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Colton Ortolf (@ColtonOrtolf) who blogs at tech prescribed on the topic of “The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management“. Chronic disease is an incredibly broad term, but it can be simply defined as “a physical or mental health condition that lasts more than one year and causes functional restrictions or requires ongoing monitoring or treatment.” In all, 86% of $2 trillion in US healthcare expenditures eac...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: #HITsm Digital Health Healthcare HealthCare IT #HITsm Topics Chronic Care Management Chronic Disease Management Colton Ortolf tech prescribed Source Type: blogs
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Daniel G. Fuster, Orson W. MoeRenal tubular acidosis (RTA) is comprised of a diverse group of congenital or acquired diseases with the common denominator of defective renal acid excretion with protean manifestation, but in adults, recurrent kidney stones and nephrocalcinosis are mainly found in presentation. Calcium phosphate (CaP) stones and nephrocalcinosis are frequently encountered in distal hypokalemic RTA type I. Alkaline urinary pH, hypocitraturia, and, less frequently, hypercalciuria are the tripartite lithogenic fac...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Junior Uduman, Jerry YeeHyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, particularly renal tubular acidosis, can pose diagnostic challenges. The laboratory phenotype of a low total carbon dioxide content, normal anion gap, and hyperchloremia may be misconstrued as hypobicarbonatemia from renal tubular acidosis. Several disorders can mimic renal tubular acidosis, and these must be appropriately diagnosed to prevent inadvertent and inappropriate application of alkali therapy. Key physiologic principles and limitations in the assessment of ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Gal Finer, Daniel LandauProximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA) is an inherited or acquired clinical syndrome in which there is a decreased bicarbonate reclamation in the proximal tubule resulting in normal anion gap hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. In children, pRTA may be isolated but is often associated with a general proximal tubular dysfunction known as Fanconi syndrome which frequently heralds an underlying systemic disorder from which it arises. When accompanied by Fanconi syndrome, pRTA is characterized by additiona...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Ira KurtzRenal tubular acidosis (RTA) represents a group of diseases characterized by (1) a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis; (2) abnormalities in renal HCO3− absorption or new renal HCO3− generation; (3) changes in renal NH4+, Ca2+, K+, and H2O homeostasis; and (4) extrarenal manifestations that provide etiologic diagnostic clues. The focus of this review is to give a general overview of the pathogenesis of the various clinical syndromes causing RTA with a particular emphasis on type I (hypokalemic distal RTA...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Daniel Batlle, Jose ArrudaIn contrast to distal type I or classic renal tubular acidosis (RTA) that is associated with hypokalemia, hyperkalemic forms of RTA also occur usually in the setting of mild-to-moderate CKD. Two pathogenic types of hyperkalemic metabolic acidosis are frequently encountered in adults with underlying CKD. One type, which corresponds to some extent to the animal model of selective aldosterone deficiency (SAD) created experimentally by adrenalectomy and glucocorticoid replacement, is manifested in human...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Patricia G. Vallés, Daniel BatlleDistal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA) is defined as hyperchloremic, non-anion gap metabolic acidosis with impaired urinary acid excretion in the presence of a normal or moderately reduced glomerular filtration rate. Failure in urinary acid excretion results from reduced H+ secretion by intercalated cells in the distal nephron. This results in decreased excretion of NH4+ and other acids collectively referred as titratable acids while urine pH is typically above 5.5 in the face of systemi...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Daniel Batlle, Jose Arruda
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 4Author(s): Kalani L. Raphael, Jerry Yee
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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