3 Ways to End the Dementia Care Blame Game

Are persons afflicted with dementia inherently mean?The answer is no, and studies prove it.What can you do?1.Look for patterns of bad behavior, and when they are happening.2.Establish a dailyroutine.3.Introduce activities into your day thatkeep dementia patients occupied.The Alzheimer's Caregiver Blame GameBy Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail:1. Identify the Patterns of BehaviorOne of the most effective things I did as a caregiver isstart keeping track (writing down) thenegative episodes that my mother would perform each day.I started to realize that many of these difficult behaviors happened around the same time each day.For example, my mother would get up around 9:37 PM,get all agitated, and say she had to clean our home. She did not do this at any other time during the day.How did I solve this problem?Ice Cream.Around 9:15 I would start moving my mother to our kitchen. I would get her settled in, give her a smile, and engage her in some conversation. Around 9:30 PM I would ask, would you like some ice cream. The answer was always the same.She loved ice cream.How to Use Ice Cream as a Memory Care ToolA little conversation, a few smiles, and a dose of ice cream solved the problem. It went away and never came back.I would use a similar tactic when my mother would get thatdull, mean, I'm not here look on her faceduring the day. I used potato chips to solve that problem.Alzheimer's symptomsLook for patterns of bad behavior and fin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers alzheimers caregiving blame care of dementia patients dementia activities dementia blame dementia care dementia help for caregivers dementia routine help alzheimer's memory care Source Type: blogs

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Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
Mouse study reverses memory loss in mice with Alzheimer's. → There is now a small membership fee for accessing some articles. Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia Source Type: blogs
The test measures levels of a key protein in the blood. → There is now a small membership fee for accessing some articles. Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): Bettina Maria Foidl, Christian HumpelAbstractAlzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder and the most common form of dementia coming along with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in more than 70% of all cases. However, CAA occurs also in pure form without AD pathology. Vascular life style risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, stress or an old age play an important role in the progression of CAA. So far, no animal model for sporadic CAA has been reported,...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder and the most common form of dementia coming along with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in more than 70% of all cases. However, CAA occurs also in pure form without AD pathology. Vascular life style risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, stress or an old age play an important role in the progression of CAA. So far, no animal model for sporadic CAA has been reported, thus the aim of the present study was to create and characterize a new mouse model for sporadic CAA by treatment with different va...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Here’s another reason why getting a good night’s sleep should be on your must-do list: Sleeping fewer than six hours a night or waking frequently raises your risk of developing damaging plaque in arteries throughout your body, not just your heart. Previous research has shown poor sleep to be strongly associated with coronary heart disease, but “This is the first study to show that objectively measured sleep is independently associated with atherosclerosis throughout the body,” José Ordovás, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA H...
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For many, music from certain eras can bring back memories of better times. For others, music soothes anxiety or gets them pumped up for a workout. When it comes to people living with dementia, music can help in all of those ways, but it can also help cognition. Hospice organizations are keenly aware of the soothing power of music. Sometimes the music may be used casually, by the facility or the family, knowing that this is a type of music that the person who is in the dying process had always enjoyed. Increasingly, though, employing trained music therapists has been favored. Read the full article on HealthCentral about how...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The drug healed synaptic connections in the brain and memories were partially restored. → Enjoying these psych studies? Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month (includes ad-free experience and more articles). → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: NEW: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia Source Type: blogs
This study examined the link between depression/anxiety/PTSD and dementia by evaluating the prevalence of these disorders in people with dementia, relative to their healthy peers. Existing meta-analyses have examined the prevalence of clinically-significant depression and anxiety in Alzheimer ’s disease (AD), and depression in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but have not considered vascular dementia (VaD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), PTSD, or anxiety in FTD. The current meta-analysis compared the prevalence of clinically-significant depression, anxiety and PTSD in the four most com mon types of dementia (AD, VaD,...
Source: Neuropsychology Review - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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