Utilization Status and Satisfaction with Medical Services in Nonresidential Foreign Medical Tourists Visiting a Korean Medicine Hospital.

This study examined the characteristics, medical service use, and satisfaction of foreign patients who visited a spine-specialty Korean medicine hospital as musculoskeletal disorders are the highest frequency category of medical conditions treated using Korean medicine. The electronic medical records of 1,733 foreign patients who had first visited an integrative Korean medicine hospital in 2012-2015 were analyzed, and a satisfaction survey was conducted by e-mail along with phone calls and interviews. Female patients in their 40s with low back or neck pain comprised the most prevalent patient group. The most frequently used visiting channels were agencies, followed by recommendation by friends or family. Patients received an average of 5.25 sessions, and, based on analysis of 134 survey results, the highest satisfaction rates were associated with acupuncture and pharmacopuncture of provided treatments, high physician expertise, and reliability among medical services and coordinating and translating services among nonmedical factors. Overall, 90.2% replied that they were satisfied and 76.9% that their perception of Korean medicine had improved following treatment. Nonresidential foreigners who received integrative medicine treatment expressed high satisfaction, but visiting and promotion channels were shown to be limited, which connotes both the potential of Korean medicine in propelling Korea forward in the global medical tourism industry and the need for more systematic prom...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research

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(Natural News) Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) causes chronic back pain, which is relieved through a variety of treatment methods. In a study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Japanese researchers compared the effectiveness of medication, exercise, and acupuncture – the three most commonly prescribed approaches – for relieving pain caused by LSS....
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study characterizes and evaluates how Integrative Healing Services (IHS) affects patient pain levels and length of stay. We also performed a literature review to examine national trends in inpatient integrative healing.MethodsAn IHS team (e.g. acupuncture, healing touch, music therapy, pet therapy, and counseling) was incorporated into the treatment regimen of neurosurgery inpatients (with>4 days of stay) with chronic or intractable pain, stress or depression, and/or patients intolerant to or who failed physical or occupational therapy.Results34 charts were retrospectively reviewed, with 17 patients receiving IHS...
Source: Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
Conclusions IHS intervention may be an effective option for treating pain and decreasing hospital length of stay. National trends support the use of integrative healing and will likely continue to increase as further studies are performed.
Source: Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
Abstract Low back and pelvic girdle pain (LBPGP) is a common complaint among pregnant women, which increases throughout pregnancy and women use various complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to manage their pain. Using an online survey, CAM treatments used by pregnant women in the UK and their perceptions of these therapies to relieve LBPGP were investigated. 191 women completed the survey and 70% experienced LBPGP lasting more than one week. Over half of women who sought treatment from a GP or physiotherapist were dissatisfied. 25% of participants used CAM during pregnancy, the most popular being ...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
It is easy to ridicule a 2000-year-old treatment that can seem closer to magic than to science. Indeed, from the 1970s to around 2005, the skeptic’s point of view was understandable, because the scientific evidence to show that acupuncture worked, and why, was weak, and clinical trials were small and of poor quality. But things have changed since then. A lot. Thanks to the development of valid placebo controls (for example, a retractable “sham” device that looks like an acupuncture needle but does not penetrate the skin), and the publication of several large and well-designed clinical trials in the last d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
The media is abuzz over a study reporting that use of a cell phone app to train women in self-acupressure is effective as pain medication for treating menstrual cramps. The Android app is called AKUD and is written in German, so unless du sprichst Deutch, it won’t do you much good. But let’s ignore that for now. Here’s the study intervention: The study intervention Participants received a menstrual tracking App that included instructions on acupressure for cramp relief. They also got one-on-one instruction on the location of specific acupressure points and use of acupressure using drawings and v...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Alternative Medicine Women's Health app cell phone menstrual cramps Source Type: blogs
t JF Abstract BACKGROUND: The coverage for acupuncture for chronic lower back or knee pain by the statutory health insurance was introduced in 2007. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of patients and providers of acupuncture and temporal and regional trends in the utilization of acupuncture. METHODS: This retrospective observational study used anonymized statutory health insurance claims data from a sample of roughly four million subjects. The sample is representative of the German population regarding age and gender in 2013. RESULTS: Lower back pain was the most common coded i...
Source: Schmerz - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Schmerz Source Type: research
This article offers a brief critical review of integrative medical therapies used to treat chronic pain, including nutritional supplements, yoga, relaxation, tai chi, massage, spinal manipulation, and acupuncture. The goal of this article is to identify those treatments that show evidence of efficacy and to identify gaps in the literature where additional studies and controlled trials are needed. An electronic search of the databases of PubMed, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Science Citation Index Expanded was conducted. Overall, weak positive evidence was found for yoga, relaxation, tai chi, massage, and mani...
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
ConclusionsElectroacupuncture activates 5‐HT 1A receptors in the spinal cord and inhibits p‐CaMKII to alleviate both allodynia and hyperalgesia. The data support acupuncture/EA as a complementary therapy for CIP. SignificanceElectroacupuncture (EA) activates spinal 5‐HT1A receptors to inhibit p‐CaMKII to alleviate paclitaxel‐induced pain. Acupuncture/EA may be used as a complementary therapy for CIP.
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Authors: Zhang B, Xu H, Wang J, Liu B, Sun G Abstract Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (LIDH), as the main contributor to low back pain and sciatica, imposes a heavy burden on both the individual and society. Non-operative treatment or conservative treatment has proven effective in alleviation of the symptoms of LIDH and are considered to be a first-line choice for most cases. Active lifestyle, physical therapy, complementary and alternative medicine therapy or Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) therapy, and pharmacotherapy are routinely used as effective non-operative treatment for LIDH patients. However, how...
Source: BioScience Trends - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Biosci Trends Source Type: research
More News: Acupuncture | Alternative and Complementary Therapies | Back Pain | Complementary Medicine | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | Hospitals | Medical Tourism | Pain | South Korea Health | Study