Remember Dr. Kevorkian?

For those of you who are too young, he was a retired pathologist back in the 1990s who helped terminally ill people end their lives as a sort of crusade. This was completely illegal at the time, everywhere in the country. He was prosecuted a couple of times, but juries would not convict -- apparently you couldn't find 12 people who thought that what he did deserved criminal sanction. This was despite his notably abrasive personality. He wasn't a persuasive person, but his actions spoke for themselves and most people evidently supported them.He finally was convicted. The basic difference was that in the previous cases, he had set up his " suicide machine " -- a gas delivery system -- and let his customers (I don't know if you should call them patients) push the button themselves. In the case for which he was convicted, the client was paralyzed and unable to initiate the process, so the good doctor did it himself. This seems a trivial moral distinction to me -- the guy very clearly articulated his desire -- but it does seem to matter to many people.Anyway, so-called Physician Assisted Dying (PAD) is now legal in Oregon, Washington, Vermont, Colorado and the District of Columbia, by law; and in Montana, by court decision. (A law in California was recently overturned on a technicality before it could take effect. We'll see where that goes.) Here's a summary history. I expect that PAD sounds better than physician assisted suicide, and I'll grant that there is a...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

We report a case of a patient with advanced cervical cancer who presented with uncontrollable pain, MDD, and a suicide attempt. RESULT: A 39-year-old woman diagnosed with cervical cancer stage IVB presented to the Emergency Department after a suicide attempt by hanging. Upon evaluation by the palliative care psychiatrist, she reported intense pain, unresponsive to analgesics, and had a history of persistent suicidal ideation. Antidepressant treatment was started (sertraline 50mg/d) after a single dose of ketamine hydrochloride IV (0.5 mg/kg) was administered. Treatment response was measured using the Brief Edinburgh D...
Source: Palliative and Supportive Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Palliat Support Care Source Type: research
In this study, senescent cell distribution and quantity in vastus lateralis muscle were examined in young human adults after a single bout of resistance exercise. To determine the effects of dietary protein availability around exercise on senescent cell quantity and macrophage infiltration of skeletal muscle, two isocaloric protein supplements (14% and 44% in calorie) were ingested before and immediately after an acute bout of resistance exercise, in a counter-balanced crossover fashion. An additional parallel trial was conducted to compare the outcome of muscle mass increment under the same dietary conditions after 12 wee...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This is the 1000th presentation to my bioethics blog since starting on Google Blogspot.com in 2004.There has been many topics covered. Though comments by the visitors has always been encouraged and, since as a " discussion blog " , comments leading to discussions I have felt was the definitive function here. Virtually none of the thread topics have gone unread and most have had some commentary, some with mainly particularly strong and emphatic opinions http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2013/01/should-pathologists-be-physicians.html, some with extensive up to 12 years long continued discussion http://bioethi...
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)I ’m a little bored of all the discussion about physician-assisted suicide. Mostly it’s because legalizing PAS is going to have zero impact on nearly all of my patients, and I think the significant amount of press and energy it gets is a distraction from other things which actually would improve t he lives (and deaths) of the patients and families I care for as a palliative doc.The last time I blogged about PAS waspart of my euphemisms series last year, when I elaborated why I did not like terms like ‘assisted death’ or ‘aid-in-dying’ and prefer ‘assist...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: ethics euthanasia/suicide health policy rosielle Source Type: blogs
The answer: We need to address what’s happening inside the office as well as stigma. During the creation of the documentary Going Sane I interviewed Cindy Bulik. She is perhaps the most important researcher on anorexia today. She lives between UNC where she is a distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders and Sweden where she is a professor at the Karolinska Institute. Her current research is exploring genetic influences on anorexia and by the end of our interview she asked if my entire family would be willing to give a sample of blood for the study. She is not the single-minded professor oblivious to social customs...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Disabilities Disorders Editorials Essays Medications Motivation and Inspiration Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Suicide Treatment Child Development child therapy Clinical Outcome evidence-based practices evidence Source Type: news
Conclusion: Patients with LEP had significant differences and disparities in end-of-life decision-making. Interventions to facilitate informed decision-making for those with LEP is a crucial component of care for this group. THU 1:30 pm:  “But She’ll Die if You Don’t!”: Understanding and Communicating Risks at the End of Life (Janet Malek) Clinicians sometimes decline to offer interventions even if their refusal will result in an earlier death for their patients. For example, a nephrologist may decide against initiating hemodialysis despite a patient’s rising creatinine levels if dea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
Authors: Wand AP, Peisah C, Draper B, Jones C, Brodaty H Abstract Suicide amongst the very old is an important public health issue. Little is known about why older people may express a wish to die or request euthanasia and how such thoughts may intersect with suicide attempts. Palliative care models promote best care as holistic and relieving suffering without hastening death in severely ill patients; but what of those old people who are tired of living and may have chronic symptoms, disability, and reduced quality of life? Two cases of older people who attempted suicide but expressed a preference for euthanasia we...
Source: Case Reports in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Case Rep Psychiatry Source Type: research
In conclusion, we found that IS status was associated with a significant increase in Hannum DNA methylation, likely as a consequence of the accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors, and near signification with Horvath method. Patients with IS were biologically older than controls, a difference that was more obvious in young stroke. This could open up the possibility of useful new biomarker of stroke risk. Latest Headlines from Fight Aging! A Profile of Kelsey Moody and Ichor Therapeutics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/09/a-profile-of-kelsey-moody
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Patients with a new diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may struggle with uncertainty about progression and the realization that they will lose key functions and how they will ultimately cope. Eventually, most lose abilities to talk, walk or transfer, swallow, and feed themselves, and are increasingly dependent on others. Thus, the diagnosis creates a complex psychodynamic and existential struggle based on current disabilities and future fears. It follows that patients with ALS elect physician-assisted death (PAD) with greater frequency than cancer.1,2
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Palliative care EDITORIALS Source Type: research
How much should ethicists know about the topics they comment on? Is it enough to have a vague idea? Should they be required to demonstrate an understanding of the subject matter? Are they required to pay attention to available evidence? In response to Schuklenk's and Vathorst's proposal that individuals with treatment-resistant depression should have access to assisted dying,1 Christopher Cowley has presented a contrary argument based on comparison with the situation faced by patients with motor neurone disease (MND).2 In Cowley's view, MND is a "non-terminal but untreatable debilitating disease(s)" which "....
Source: Journal of Medical Ethics - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular medicine, Epidemiologic studies, End of life decisions (geriatric medicine), End of life decisions (palliative care), Suicide (psychiatry), Disability, Assisted dying, End of life decisions (ethics), Psychology and medicine, Suicide (public Source Type: research
More News: American Health | Depression | Disability | Grants | Legislation | Medical Ethics | Palliative | Palliative Care | Pathology | Study | Suicide