6 Ways Climate Change is Making Us Sick

MoreThe High Risks of High Summer TemperaturesToledo’s Contaminated Water: Here’s What Went WrongDengue Fever Infections in Florida Make Health Experts Wary of Mosquito-Borne OutbreakJust a day after the People’s Climate March, one of the largest international environmental marches, a new analysis of 56 studies on climate change-related health problems shows that increasingly, global temperatures and severe weather events will continue to have a major impact on global health. MoreEbola ‘Pretty Much Contained’ in Senegal and NigeriaEbola Lockdown in Sierra Leone Finds 150 New CasesWhere Is She? Search for Missing Student Streamlined NBC NewsCould Putin Be the World's Next Weapon to Battle ISIS? NBC NewsKnow Your Solar System: Why Is Mars Red? NBC NewsIn the U.S. alone, several cities are expected to experience many more frequent hot days by the year 2050, and New York City and Milwaukee for example, may have three times their current average of hot days that reach over 90 degrees. According to researchers from the University of Wisconsin, this is just one consequence of human-driven climate change. Popular Among Subscribers The Tragic Risks of American Football Subscribe U2’s Mission to Save MusicRules of the GameCurrently, 97% of scientists studying climate agree that climate change is caused by humans. The new study, which is published in JAMA, lays out what these wide ranging effects on public h...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized climate change Deforestation dengue fever Fossil fuels heat-related illness Infectious Disease respiratory disease tropical disease Source Type: news

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