Sleep Disturbance Common With Anorexia or Bulimia Sleep Disturbance Common With Anorexia or Bulimia

Women with eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia may also experience significant trouble sleeping, suggests a small study in Egypt.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

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When I was sixteen years old, I met every requirement in the DSM-IV criteria for Anorexia Nervosa. My Body Mass Index (BMI) hovered just below 17.5, I was obsessed with counting calories and becoming skinnier, I was terrified of gaining even a single pound of weight, and I lost my period for longer than three consecutive cycles. My iron and ferritin levels fell below normal and I was tired all of the time. Before long, I was avoiding eating with my friends and family, and I had given up my favorite sports because I was too weak to run the warm-ups. I was never diagnosed with an eating disorder, however; I refused help beca...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Body Image Source Type: news
In this episode, our hosts discuss whether or not mental illness is a real disorder or if it’s just something that medical and pharmaceutical companies made up to make a profit.  SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW “Instead of taking my psychiatric medications this morning, should I have just gone to yoga?” – Michelle Hammer Highlights from ‘Mental Illness Made Up’ Episode [2:00] Is mental illness real? [4:00] Yoga doesn’t cure all mental illnesses, just like it wouldn’t cure cancer. [16:00] Dealing with people who think mental illness is not real. [19:30] Eating disorders ar...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Brain and Behavior Disorders General Source Type: blogs
ConclusionNES has its clinical significance; however, it overlaps with BN in several dimensions of psychopathology. Presence of night eating in a BN group may not contribute clinically meaningful psychopathology.
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
I went for a run because I had eaten a small, organic, dark chocolate cookie the day before and I felt that I had to punish myself. It was habitual for me to punish myself with strenuous, caloric compensation cardio whenever I felt guilty for enjoying life by eating tasty foods. When I placed first in a fitness competition, my fitness goals went up a notch. Winning the competition was one thing, but people complimenting me on my extra lean body pressured me to stay that way. I couldn’t allow myself to look “bigger” again, and “bigger” really meant not seeing my defined ab muscles. It was a su...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Personal Spirituality Fitness Loving Kindness Meditation self-compassion Source Type: blogs
There’s a ton of incredibly promising intermittent fasting (IF) research done on fat rats. They lose weight, their blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugars improve… but they’re rats. Studies in humans, almost across the board, have shown that IF is safe and incredibly effective, but really no more effective than any other diet. In addition, many people find it difficult to fast. But a growing body of research suggests that the timing of the fast is key, and can make IF a more realistic, sustainable, and effective approach for weight loss, as well as for diabetes prevention. The backstory on intermit...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Source Type: blogs
Sleep wake cycle and eating patterns undergo major changes throughout life and are proved to be very correlated, eating disorders prevalence is increasing nowadays and sleep problems are very common among them. The current study is concerned with investigating the sleep pattern in anorexia and bulimia female patients using subjective and objective assessment tools.
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Everyone ruminates. We especially ruminate when we’re stressed out. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming test—you have to score an A to keep your scholarship. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming presentation because you want to impress your boss. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming date and the many ways it could go. Maybe you’re ruminating about a bad performance review. Maybe you’re ruminating about an injury that’s really been bothering you. “We are evolutionarily wired to obsess,” according to psychiatrist Britton Arey, M.D. We are wired to se...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Binge Eating Bulimia Depression Disorders Eating Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorders Distressing Thoughts Mindfulness Negative Thinki Source Type: news
I often hear the question: “Is overeating the same as binge eating?” This is an understandable question, given that “overeating” and “binging” are terms that you hear frequently in the media or in casual day-to-day conversations. It’s common to use these terms interchangeably, however mental health professionals define them differently. Overeating is a behavior that everyone does from time to time. Binge eating is quite different. People who engage in frequent binge eating can struggle with isolation, depression and low self-worth. Additionally, their pattern of eating may have a ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Health-related Self-Esteem Anorexia Nervosa Binge Eating Disorder Bingeing binging Bulimia Nervosa Depression dieting Guilt Nutrition overeating Remorse snacking Source Type: blogs
The dentist may not be your favorite appointment, but it’s a necessity.  Good oral hygiene saves you from more than just tooth decay, cavities and bad breath. It is critically important because it can help prevent certain medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. And here’s something else: The state of your teeth, mouth and gums can clue your dentist into other medical issues you may need to address. By examining your mouth, your dentist can identify eating disorders, sleeping problems, anxiety, stress and more. Below are some of the things dentists can see about yo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
18 years ago I found myself drawn to a light switch. Turning the lights on and off became an ordeal as every room’s light switch hypnotized me into gliding my fingers across it, pressing my fingertips against the smooth plastic until it satisfied me. A similar undertaking occurred with door knobs. I felt the intense need to wrap my hands tightly around the knob, releasing it and then grasping it again. I did this until the tightness in my stomach dissolved, until I felt calm enough to walk away. Around the same time, intrusive thoughts infiltrated my mind. They b...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Binge Eating Bulimia Children and Teens Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Family Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personal Stories Anorexia Nervosa Avoidance Body Dysmorphic Disorder Bulimia Nervosa compulsive pic Source Type: news
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