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Male depression may lower pregnancy chances among infertile couples, NIH study suggests

Study also links women ’s use of non-SSRI antidepressants to early pregnancy loss.
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - Category: American Health Source Type: news

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Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to astudy inFertility and Sterility. In contrast, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of pregnancy or live birth.Depression rates are known to be high among couples seeking fertility treatments, with previous research finding 41% of women and nearly 50% of men in such couples show signs of depression, wrote Emily A. Evans-Hoeker, M.D., of Virginia Tech Carilion, and colleagues.To investigate the role of depression on pregnancy outcomes in couples seeking non-IVF treat...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants depression Emily A. Evans-Hoeker Esther Eisenberg infertility pregnancy SSRIs Source Type: research
Women having trouble getting pregnant sometimes try yoga, meditation or mindfulness, and some research suggests that psychological stress may affect infertility. But what about men: Does their mental state affect a couple's ability to conceive? The latest research on this subject was published Thursday in the journal Fertility and Sterility and suggests that a link between mental health […]Related:CDC comes close to an all-clear on romaine lettuce as E. coli outbreak nears historic levelSurrogate mothers ask Supreme Court to stop ‘exploitation’ of women and babiesMore men with low-risk pro...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Women having trouble getting pregnant sometimes try yoga, meditation or mindfulness, and some research suggests that psychological stress may affect infertility. But what about men: Does their mental state affect a couple's ability to conceive? The latest research on this subject was published Thursday in the journal Fertility and Sterility and suggests that a link between mental health […]Related:CDC comes close to an all-clear on romaine lettuce as E. coli outbreak nears historic levelSurrogate mothers ask Supreme Court to stop ‘exploitation’ of women and babiesMore men with low-risk pro...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, while depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of live birth, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.The study, which appears in Fertility and Sterility, also linked a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
It is well established that infertility, and the process of going through fertility treatment, is associated with psychological distress, and with depression in particular (1). Of course, one of the primary methods used to treat depression is medication. In the U.S. antidepressants are one of the most frequently prescribed types of mediation, with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) being the most common class. This begs the question, should fertility treatment patients (or pregnant women) struggling with depression be treated with antidepressant medications? What are the risks versus the benefits?
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @mallikamarshall When I was about 10 years old, my mother had me take a puff on an unfiltered Camel cigarette in an effort to discourage me from smoking in the future. Well, needless to say, it worked. After coughing and sputtering for what seemed like hours, I have never touched another cigarette. While I am in no way suggesting that parents follow in my mother’s footsteps (in fact I would strongly discourage it), as a pediatrician and parent myself I want to ensure that children and teens never take that first puff. But in fact, the majority of smokers in the US begin smoking in their youth. Ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
The majority of legal abortions performed in the U.S. are safe, free of complications and devoid of long-term health effects, according to a comprehensive new report. A committee assembled by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine analyzed available data on abortion safety, quality and care. The resulting report, published Friday, says the four major abortion methods used in the U.S. — medication, aspiration, induction and dilation and evacuation (D&E) — are all safe and effective, and that complications are rare. The vast majority of U.S. abortions — 90% — are also performed ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Reproductive Health Source Type: news
ConclusionInfertile couples may benefit from psychiatric evaluation and treatment of both partners. This article investigates the connection between stress, anxiety and depression and IVF failure in infertile couples and identifies underlying cytokine pathways.
Source: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Conclusion: This case highlights the complex interplay between ovarian steroids, depletion of their levels, and psychiatric sequelae. The postpartum period represents a particularly vulnerable time for patients with premature ovarian insufficiency, which requires very close monitoring and early replacement of depleted hormone levels.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research
Authors: Salih Joelsson L, Tydén T, Wanggren K, Georgakis MK, Stern J, Berglund A, Skalkidou A Abstract BACKGROUND: Infertility has been associated with psychological distress, but whether these symptoms persist after achieving pregnancy via assisted reproductive technology (ART) remains unclear. We compared the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms between women seeking for infertility treatment and women who conceived after ART or naturally. METHODS: Four hundred and sixty-eight sub-fertile non-pregnant women, 2972 naturally pregnant women and 143 women pregnant after ART completed a questionna...
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
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