Male depression may lower pregnancy chances among infertile couples, NIH study suggests

(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, while depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of live birth, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.The study, which appears in Fertility and Sterility, also linked a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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ConclusionThis program was evaluated positively. The AALS, PTGI ‐J, EPDS, and STAI showed significant change after the program and the AALS, PTGI‐J, and STAI‐J showed significant correlations with the CNSS.
Source: Japan Journal of Nursing Science - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
I am still not able to cope up with negative pregnancy test. I just wished that the test still comes positive. My good looking embryos do not like to settle in my good looking endometrium lining. I wish that I could know what these beautiful embryos wants more from me? Why all these medicines,efforts, patience, care, precautions and prayers for having a baby is not paying off. What else can we do to fulfill our dream to have a baby ?Crying is also not helping. After getting result, I spent entire day in reading positive ivf stories on internet I know that in this journey nobody get success immediately, every couple have th...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Trying to get pregnant can cause extra pressure and stress in a person's life, so depression is a common side effect of infertility. Learn more about coping here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Fertility Source Type: news
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether stress biomarker and psychological indices of stress may predict both conception and miscarriage rates in women undergoing in-vitro fertilization/ intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ ICSI). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: A university-affiliated tertiary hospital. POPULATION OR SAMPLE: Infertility women who were undergoing fresh or frozen IVF/ICSI cycles. METHODS: Subjects were recruited to (1) completed validated psychological questionnaires (visual analogue scale of stress, state trait anxiety inventory, perceived stress scale, fer...
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
Abstract Psychosocial aspects of fertility, infertility, and assisted reproductive technology (ART) can significantly impact patients' sense of self-identity and personal agency, mental well-being, sexual and marital relationships, reproductive efficiency, compliance with treatment, and pregnancy outcomes. Research is needed to understand how stress, anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and psychotropic medications impact fertility and infertility treatment. The psychosocial implications of ART on our society include a shift toward older maternal age at conception, the complexities of third-party reproduction, and...
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: These results add to our knowledge of the emotional state of women and their partners during pregnancy after infertility. This knowledge may allow prenatal care providers to offer specialized counselling to women and their partners in the transition from infertility to parenthood. PMID: 30100195 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Women Birth - Category: Midwifery Authors: Tags: Women Birth Source Type: research
Psychosocial aspects of fertility, infertility, and assisted reproductive technology (ART) can significantly impact patients ’ sense of self-identity and personal agency, mental well-being, sexual and marital relationships, reproductive efficiency, compliance with treatment, and pregnancy outcomes. Research is needed to understand how stress, anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and psychotropic medications impact ferti lity and infertility treatment. The psychosocial implications of ART on our society include a shift toward older maternal age at conception, the complexities of third-party reproduction, and considera...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionResults cast doubt on the belief that distress impedes the success of infertility treatment, offering hope and optimism to the many women who feel emotionally responsible for the outcome of ART and informing the evidence-based practices of their health-care providers. We also identify specific areas and research methods needed to corroborate and extend study conclusions, including study of factors that elevate or attenuate distress in women undergoing infertility treatment.
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
You couldn’t get pregnant easily, and needed fertility treatments. You had a miscarriage. Or several. You developed complications during your pregnancy. You delivered your baby preterm. Every single one of Parijat Deshpande’s clients feels like their bodies have betrayed them because of the above reasons. Deshpande, MS, is a perinatal mind-body wellness counselor and high-risk pregnancy expert, who helps women navigate stress so they can manage pregnancy complications and give their baby a strong start to life. Psychologist Julie Bindeman, PsyD, works with women struggling with reproductive challenges, depressi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Betrayal Fertility miscarriage Parenthood Pregnancy Source Type: blogs
ConclusionResults cast doubt on the belief that distress impedes the success of infertility treatment, offering hope and optimism to the many women who feel emotionally responsible for the outcome of ART and informing the evidence-based practices of their health-care providers. We also identify specific areas and research methods needed to corroborate and extend study conclusions, including study of factors that elevate or attenuate distress in women undergoing infertility treatment.
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
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