Researchers Discover Deadly New Pig Virus That Could Spread to Humans

(KDKA/CBS Local) – Researchers say they have identified a new pig virus that could be a threat to humans. The virus was found to easily make its way into laboratory-cultured cells of humans and other species, a discovery that raises concerns about potential outbreaks in people. Researchers at The Ohio State University and Utrecht University in the Netherlands collaborated to better understand the new virus identified as porcine deltacoronavirus. Their study appears online in the journal PNAS. Scientists say the virus was first discovered in pigs in China in 2012. It was first detected in the United States in 2014 during a diarrhea outbreak in Ohio pigs and has now since been detected in other countries. Scientists say that the pigs infected experience acute diarrhea and vomiting, and it can be fatal. “We’re very concerned about emerging coronaviruses and worry about the harm they can do to animals and their potential to jump to humans,” said Linda Saif, an investigator in Ohio State’s Food Animal Health Research Program at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. There have been no human cases documented, but scientists are concerned because of the virus’ similarity to SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome.) Saif says, for now, the only known infections in species other than pigs have been in a laboratory using cultured cells. In addition to cultured human cells, the virus was...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Local TV talkers Source Type: news

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Rui Dong1, Lily He1, Rong Lucy He2 and Stephen S.-T. Yau1* 1Department of Mathematical Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China 2Department of Biological Sciences, Chicago State University, Chicago, IL, United States Classification of DNA sequences is an important issue in the bioinformatics study, yet most existing methods for phylogenetic analysis including Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) are time-consuming and computationally expensive. The alignment-free methods are popular nowadays, whereas the manual intervention in those methods usually decreases the accuracy. Also, the interactions among nucleotid...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
ing Bats are known to harbor and transmit many emerging and re-emerging viruses, many of which are extremely pathogenic in humans but do not cause overt pathology in their bat reservoir hosts: henipaviruses (Nipah and Hendra), filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg), and coronaviruses (SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV). Direct transmission cycles are often implicated in these outbreaks, with virus shed in bat feces, urine, and saliva. An additional mode of virus transmission between bats and humans requiring further exploration is the spread of disease via arthropod vectors. Despite the shared ecological niches that bats fill with many h...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
ng Zhou During the past two decades, three zoonotic coronaviruses have been identified as the cause of large-scale disease outbreaks–Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and Swine Acute Diarrhea Syndrome (SADS). SARS and MERS emerged in 2003 and 2012, respectively, and caused a worldwide pandemic that claimed thousands of human lives, while SADS struck the swine industry in 2017. They have common characteristics, such as they are all highly pathogenic to humans or livestock, their agents originated from bats, and two of them originated in China. Thus, it is highly...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
This article aims at reviewing the various aspects of the global epidemiology of bat coronaviruses (CoVs). Before the SARS epidemic, bats were not known to be hosts for CoVs. In the last 15 years, bats have been found to be hosts of >30 CoVs with complete genomes sequenced, and many more if those without genome sequences are included. Among the four CoV genera, only alphaCoVs and betaCoVs have been found in bats. As a whole, both alphaCoVs and betaCoVs have been detected from bats in Asia, Europe, Africa, North and South America and Australasia; but alphaCoVs seem to be more widespread than betaCoVs, and their detec...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: CellAuthor(s): Alexandra C. Walls, Xiaoli Xiong, Young-Jun Park, M. Alejandra Tortorici, Joost Snijder, Joel Quispe, Elisabetta Cameroni, Robin Gopal, Mian Dai, Antonio Lanzavecchia, Maria Zambon, Félix A. Rey, Davide Corti, David VeeslerSummaryRecent outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome, along with the threat of a future coronavirus-mediated pandemic, underscore the importance of finding ways to combat these viruses. The trimeric spike transmembrane glycoprotein S mediates entry into host cells and is the m...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Purpose: Coronaviruses are RNA viruses encompassing four genera. The alpha- and betacoronaviruses commonly cause mild disease in humans. However, outbreaks of severe respiratory disease in 2002 and 2012 led to the identification of highly pathogenic human betacoronaviruses, SARS- and MERS-CoV, respectively. Bats are believed to be the reservoir host from which all mammalian coronaviruses emerged.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 03.005 Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 January 2019Source: Computational and Structural Biotechnology JournalAuthor(s): Kin On Kwok, Arthur Tang, Vivian W.I. Wei, Woo Hyun Park, Eng Kiong Yeoh, Steven RileyAbstractThe emergence and reemergence of coronavirus epidemics sparked renewed concerns from global epidemiology researchers and public health administrators. Mathematical models that represented how contact tracing and follow-up may control Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) transmissions were developed for evaluating different infection control interventions, estimating ...
Source: Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal - Category: Biotechnology Source Type: research
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
Publication date: February 2019Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 34Author(s): Lin-Fa Wang, Danielle E AndersonIn the last two decades, several high impact zoonotic disease outbreaks have been linked to bat-borne viruses. These include SARS coronavirus, Hendra virus and Nipah virus. In addition, it has been suspected that ebolaviruses and MERS coronavirus are also linked to bats. It is being increasingly accepted that bats are potential reservoirs of a large number of known and unknown viruses, many of which could spillover into animal and human populations. However, our knowledge into basic bat biology and immuno...
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
lin Han Chuan Qin Coronaviruses (CoVs) have formerly been regarded as relatively harmless respiratory pathogens to humans. However, two outbreaks of severe respiratory tract infection, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), as a result of zoonotic CoVs crossing the species barrier, caused high pathogenicity and mortality rates in human populations. This brought CoVs global attention and highlighted the importance of controlling infectious pathogens at international borders. In this review, we focus on our current understa...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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