A Developmental Social Neuroscience Model for Understanding Pathways to Substance Use Disorders during Adolescence

Adolescence is a transitional period of development characterised by critical changes in physical, neural, cognitive, affective and social functions. Studies investigating the underlying mechanisms of substance use at levels of self-report, brain response and behavioural data are generally consistent with suggestions from dual-process model that differential growth rates of frontally mediated control and striato-frontal reward processing are related to a heightened risk of substance use during adolescence.
Source: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research

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