Topical Corticosteroids and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Therapy of Non-infectious Uveitis.

[Topical Corticosteroids and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Therapy of Non-infectious Uveitis]. Klin Monbl Augenheilkd. 2018 May;235(5):586-591 Authors: Doycheva D, Deuter C, Grajewski R Abstract Topical corticosteroids are effective anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of anterior uveitis. The intraocular efficacy of topical corticosteroids mostly depends on their intraocular permeability through the cornea. Lipophile derivatives such as dexamethasone and prednisolone acetate penetrate better into the anterior chamber than hydrophilic derivatives. Prednisolone acetate 1% is the first choice in the therapy of patients with anterior uveitis. Loteprednole and fluorometholone have a slightly weaker anti-inflammatory effect, but they induce less elevation of intraocular pressure and might be helpful in the treatment of patients with steroid response. Topical corticosteroid therapy has to be individually adapted, depending on the clinical course and severity of uveitis. The most common side effects of topical corticosteroids are corticosteroid-induced glaucoma and corticosteroid-induced cataracts. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit the enzyme cyclooxygenase that is responsible for the formation of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. These have an adjunctive role in the treatment and prevention of post-operative inflammation after cataract surgery. A therapeutic role of topical NSAID to treat uveitis and cystoid macular oedema secondar...
Source: Klinische Monatsblatter fur Augenheilkunde - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Klin Monbl Augenheilkd Source Type: research

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Purpose of review The aim of this review was to assess the risk factors and course of postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) increase in order to determine the optimal the treatment. Recent findings Early postoperative IOP elevation following cataract surgery is a frequent adverse event, and might represent 88% early postoperative complications. The risk factors for IOP elevation following phacoemulsification cataract surgery include residual viscoelastic material, resident performed surgery, glaucoma, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, axial length over 25 mm, tamsulosin intake, topical steroid application in steroid re...
Source: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Tags: CATARACT SURGERY AND LENS IMPLANTATION: Edited by Natalie A. Afshari Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research
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Source: Developments in Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Dev Ophthalmol Source Type: research
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