A Genetic Test Could Help Predict the Right Antidepressant For You

Depression is a complicated condition, and so are the people it affects. It’s often difficult — and can take months or even years — to find the right drugs to treat the heterogeneous mood disorder. But for decades, doctors have been treating depression essentially by prescribing a drug and hoping for the best. They rely on asking people about their family history of mental illness and fold in as much information as they can about symptoms. Since 2010, however, there has been a genetic test that can help doctors learn how a person’s genetic makeup can also affect their response to various antidepressants. In a new study presented at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting, researchers say that people using the test, called GeneSight, are 50% more likely to achieve remission after eight weeks, and 30% more likely to the respond to the drugs the test recommended, compared to people treated without the test. (The study has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal.) While there are more than a dozen antidepressant drugs — from the newer serotonin– and norepinephrine-based medications that adjust levels of the brain’s mood chemicals, to the older tricyclic and MAOI drugs — there is little to guide doctors in matching the patients to the right drugs for them. Much of the treatment for depression relies on trial and error, with anywhere from a third to 40% of people failing to respond to their first drug treatment. Ge...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Depression healthy time Source Type: news

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Nature is an important aspect of our daily lives that is too often taken for granted. Now, in our technologically-driven society, we are often shut away from nature, and the times that we are out in nature, we are unable to appreciate it in its entire splendor. It is hard to truly separate yourself from the rest of the world, considering we are always “on”, but the effects of doing so prove beneficial to your general well-being and emotional clarity. “[We] are all a part of nature. We are born in nature; our bodies are formed of nature; we live by the rules of nature,” writes Wesley P. Sc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression General Research Sunlight Vitamin D Source Type: blogs
´╗┐It’s a sad fact that many people still think a psych hospital is like what they saw in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. But modern psychiatric care is nothing like that. This week’s guest worked for years in a psychiatric emergency facility and joins us to share his thoughts about the experiences he had while employed there.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Gabe Nathan is an author, editor, actor, playwright, director and a lover of commas. He has worked as an Allied Therapist and Developmental Specialist at Montgomery County Emergency Service,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Caregivers General The Psych Central Show Treatment Gabe Howard inpatient psychiatric hospital Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
Chemical Equilibrium at the Tick–Host Feeding Interface:A Critical Examination of Biological Relevance in Hematophagous Behavior Ben J. Mans1,2,3* 1Epidemiology, Parasites and Vectors, Agricultural Research Council-Onderstepoort Veterinary Research, Pretoria, South Africa 2Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa 3Department of Life and Consumer Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa Ticks secrete hundreds to thousands of proteins into the feeding site, that presumably all play important functions in the modulation of host defense mech...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
We don’t have conversations about the power and beauty of this crucible in our culture, as we tend to squash down negative feelings and push ourselves to get back to work. That moment. The heartbreaking, life-altering moment that you find out someone you love has taken their own life is one you will never forget. Twice in the last month, I’ve had friends experience that moment. I lived through that moment five years ago, and have been forever changed by it. Suicide has been in the news lately, and seemingly on the rise— especially for young people. The CDC found in 2016 that it was the second leading caus...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Grief and Loss Publishers Spirituality & Health Suicide Trauma Grieving Process Surviving Suicide surviving trauma Source Type: blogs
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Silvia Pregnolato1*, Elavazhagan Chakkarapani1, Anthony R. Isles2 and Karen Luyt1 1Department of Neonatal Neurology, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom 2Behavioural Genetics Group, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom Preterm birth complications are the leading cause of child death worldwide and a top global health priority. Among the survivors, the risk of life-long disabilities is high, including cerebral palsy and impairment of movement, cognition, and behavior. U...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Christina Huff At one point Christina Huff was living her dream: thriving as a paralegal in Chicago and newly in love. Five years and one divorce later, she’s still piecing together the debris – living with bipolar disorder and accepting a different kind of life. She has translated her passion for law to mental health advocacy, helping others rise from difficulty with gracefulness and determination, and is a beautiful model of turning pain into service. Living with bipolar, anxiety, eating disorders, and chronic pain, she beautifully weaves bits of her life and advice from other warriors on her site, Bipolar Ho...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Interview Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Source Type: blogs
Discussion Human trafficking is estimated to be the second largest criminal activity in the world after illegal arms trafficking. It affects all nations with an estimated 27 million people of all ages worldwide but only a small number are identified. It is defined by the United Nations as “the recruitment, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons by means of threat or use of force or other forms of coercions, abduction, fraud, deception, the abuse of power, or a position of vulnerability to achieve the consent of a person, having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.” It includes comme...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
By ETIENNE DEFFARGES According the 2019 Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index, the U.S. ranks 35th out of 169 countries. Even though we are the 11th wealthiest country in the world, we are behind pretty much all developed economies in terms of health. In the Americas, not just Canada (16th) but also Cuba (30th), Chile and Costa Rica (tied for 33rd) rank ahead of us in this Bloomberg study. To answer this layered question, we need to look at the top ranked countries in the Bloomberg Index: From first to 12th, they are Spain; Italy; Iceland; Japan; Switzerland; Sweden; Australia; Singapore; Norway; Israel; Luxe...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Health disparities Health Policy American healthcare Etienne Deffarges Mediterranean Diet Opioids world health Source Type: blogs
For more than 20 years, Mary Cregan wanted to write her recently published memoir The Scar: A Personal History of Depression and Recovery, but she felt that she couldn’t. It’s primarily because she wasn’t ready to face the exposure required to be so honest about such a devastating, difficult part of her life. Because that’s the thing about writing: We let readers into our innermost thoughts and feelings, into our souls, and that can be scary. We tackle topics we’d never bring up with a close friend, let alone a stranger, and yet that’s exactly what we do. We share our stories with thou...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Creativity Disorders General Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Stigma Heartbreak Vulnerability writing Source Type: blogs
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