Pertussis (whooping cough): information for healthcare professionals

Public Health England has published information to enable healthcare professionals to identify, manage and test cases of pertussis.
Source: NHS Networks - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that, when activated by ligand-binding, has been shown to regulate the immune response. Pertussis Toxin (PTX) is a virulence factor found in Bordetella pertussis, a human respiratory pathogen that causes whooping cough. PTX promotes colonization and disease promotion by triggering a heightened inflammatory response. The role of AhR in the regulation of PTX-mediated inflammation has not previously been studied. In the current study, we investigate if AhR activation by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a well characterized ligand, can attenuate PTX-media...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Alberta Health Services has declared a whooping cough outbreak in part of southern Alberta.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Calgary Source Type: news
Conclusion. Our novel MLVA method has high discriminatory power for genotyping human B. parapertussis. Regarding this organism, this genotyping system is a promising tool for epidemiological surveillance and investigating outbreaks. PMID: 31613204 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Only one-third of pregnant women get flu and Tdap shots, despite the fact they vaccines lower the risks that they and their babies will be hospitalized for the infections, worrying CDC data revel.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
About two-thirds of pregnant women in the United States don't get vaccinated against both flu and whooping cough, putting them and their newborns at risk, a new report from the CDC says.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Millions do not, and they may be endangering their babies as well as themselves. Only 35 percent of pregnant women get both vaccines; about half get one.
Source: NYT - Category: American Health Authors: Tags: Whooping Cough Women and Girls Vaccination and Immunization Pregnancy and Childbirth Babies and Infants Influenza Centers for Disease Control and Prevention your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news
(CNN) — Most pregnant women in the United States don’t get flu and whooping cough vaccines even though the shots are safe and recommended as part of routine prenatal care, a report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The report said the low rates of vaccination during pregnancy could put moms-to-be and newborns at greater risk of infection, hospitalization and death. The two vaccinations pass on antibodies to the fetus that provide protection after birth, when babies are too young to be vaccinated. It added that pregnant women have more than double the risk of hospitalization if...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Flu Vaccine Pregnancy Whooping Cough Source Type: news
Most pregnant women in the United States don't get flu and whooping cough vaccines even though the shots are safe and recommended as part of routine prenatal care, a report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
TUESDAY, Oct. 8, 2019 -- About two-thirds of pregnant women in the United States don't get vaccinated against both flu and whooping cough, putting them and their newborns at risk, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Introduction: Whooping cough-like respiratory tract infections (WCLRTI) caused by factors other than theBordetella pertussis are available. Clinical picture is difficult to differentiate between theB. pertussisand viral respiratory infections.Methodology: Eighty-five patients with the diagnosis of WCLRTI were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 involved patients with pertussis shown by nasopharyngeal aspirate culture (NAC) and/or PCR. Group 2 consisted of patients who B. pertussis was not detected by NAC however, clinicians still evaluated them as potential patients of pertussis. Group 3 involved patients with the diagnosis of ...
Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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