Addressing the growing opioid and heroin abuse epidemic: a call for medical school curricula.

This article proposes ways to include heroin and fentanyl education into medical school curricula and highlights the potential of simulation-based medical education to enable students to develop the skillset and emotional intelligence necessary to work with patients struggling with opioid and heroin addiction. This will result in future doctors who are better prepared to both prevent and recognize opioid and heroin addiction in patients, an important step in helping reduce the number of addicted patients and address the drug overdose epidemic. PMID: 29708863 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Education Online - Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Med Educ Online Source Type: research

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New largescale study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found overprescription of opioids by dentists common, particularly to patients at high risk for substance abuse, and that almost 1/3 of patients received more powerful drugs than neededElsevierIMAGE: In this cross-sectional analysis of 542,958 dental visits by adult patients, between 1 in 4 and 1 in 2 opioid prescriptions exceeded the recommended morphine equivalents and days'supply for...viewmore Credit: Michelle S. Woods Ann Arbor, February 4, 2020 - Dentists are among top prescribers of opioids in the US, however, whether their opioid prescrib...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - Category: Dentistry Source Type: news
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs
We  learned last week that the 2017 drug overdose numbers reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clearly show most opioid-related deaths are due to illicit fentanyl and heroin, while deaths due to prescription opioids have stabilized, continuing a steady trend for the past several years. I’ve encouraged using the term “Fentanyl Crisis” rather than “Opioid Crisis” to describe the situation, because it more accurately points to its cause—nonmedical users accessing drugs in the dangerous black market fueled by drug prohibition—hoping thi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Using the three Cs of risk management strategies—collecting information, communicating, and carefully documenting—when prescribing controlled substances supports quality patient care and can decrease the risk of improper prescribing allegations. Appendix 1. Prescribing Controlled Substances: Informed Consent Some, but not all states have promulgated various requirements and recommendations for components of an informed consent discussion when prescribing controlled substances.  The following is a compilation of current individual state requirements and recommendations for informed consent. ...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Risk Management Source Type: research
[Image from The.Comedian on Flickr]The opioid epidemic is one of the deadliest problems facing the U.S. today. Through the development of new pain management devices, medtech could be a leader in solving the crisis. The prescription opioid overdose crisis in America didn’t start until the late 1990s, when pharmaceutical companies touted prescription painkillers that weren’t supposed to be addictive. As a result, medical professionals more frequently prescribed opioid painkillers. Since then, opioid-related deaths have seen a steady increase. From 2000 to 2014, nearly half a million Americans died from a drug ov...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Hospital Care mHealth (Mobile Health) Pain Management Patient Monitoring Avancen Halyard Health MedTech Myoscience nevro opioid crisis Regenesis Biomedical Inc. Source Type: news
In the last two decades, prescribing rates for opioids have increased nearly three-fold, from 76 million prescriptions in 1991 to approximately 207 million prescriptions in 2013.  This remarkable volume of opioid prescribing is unique to the United States, where 2015 prescribing amounts were nearly four times those in Europe.   Sadly, this much more frequent prescribing of addictive medications is connected to an epidemic of deaths related to abuse of opiates and other drugs of abuse.  Drug overdose deaths are now considered a national emergency, topping 59,000 in 2016.  The abuse of opioids can be...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Insurance and Coverage Organization and Delivery Payment Policy opiods PBMs Source Type: blogs
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recently released a report, requested by the United States Food and Drug Administration, that highlights what can be done to stop the opioid use disorder and other opioid-related harms without closing access to opioids for patients who need them. The committee that conducted the study and wrote the report recommended actions the FDA, other federal agencies, state and local governments, and health-related organizations should take – which include promoting more cautious prescribing of opioids, expanding access to treatment for opioid use disorder, preventi...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion and Recommendations More intervention-based clinical trials are needed to provide a strong alternative candidate therapy for management of opiate use disorder. Buprenorphine, although a promising candidate, should be researched more regarding treatment retention and patient satisfaction before any conclusions can be made regarding its standard use for opiate substitution maintenance treatment of pregnant patients with opiate use disorder. Heroin-assisted treatment still cannot be considered in opiate addicts refractory to MMT; more data should be collected regarding efficacy in larger participant populations un...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue General Review buphernorphin heroin methadone opiate opiate addiction treatment withdrawal Source Type: research
With more than 200 million prescriptions for opioid medications being written every year, it’s hard to escape the notion that physicians must share some of the blame for creating the opioid epidemic facing the nation. The criticism has come from many quarters. Editorial writers have pointed the finger of blame, as have high-ranking elected officials. More than a third of the American public think doctors are at fault, and even members of our own profession have acknowledged the unwitting complicity of physicians. There’s no denying it. Despite our well-intentioned motivation to care for our patients and treat t...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health Health care Mental Health Source Type: blogs
The CDC recently put out apaperin their Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that studied the likelihood of long term opiate use after initial treatment with an opioid medication for acute pain. The results, for me as a regular prescriber of opioid medications, were fairly shocking. The study randomly reviewed 10% of patient records from the Lifelink database over the time period of 2006-2015. If a patient was given a prescription for an opioid for longer than 10 days, there was a 1 in 5 chance that patient would be a regular opiate user one year later. That's just staggering.Few are unaware of ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: blogs
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