You Asked: Is Listening to Music Good For Your Health?

If you’re looking for an easy way to transform your mood, cue the music. Studies have shown that music can buoy your mood and fend off depression. It can also improve blood flow in ways similar to statins, lower your levels of stress-related hormones like cortisol and ease pain. Listening to music before an operation can even improve post-surgery outcomes. How can music do so much good? Music seems to “selectively activate” neurochemical systems and brain structures associated with positive mood, emotion regulation, attention and memory in ways that promote beneficial changes, says Kim Innes, a professor of epidemiology at West Virginia University’s School of Public Health. Innes coauthored a 2016 study that found music-listening could boost mood and well-being and improve stress-related measures in older adults suffering from cognitive decline. Her study compared the benefits of music to those of meditation—a practice in vogue for its mental-health perks. She found that both practices were linked to significant improvements in mood and sleep quality. “Both meditation and music listening are potentially powerful tools for improving overall health and well-being,” Innes says. If the idea of listening to music seems a lot more practicable to you than meditating, these findings are great news. But music can also agitate and unsettle, experts have learned. “Silence can be better than random listening,” says Joanne Loewy, an ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

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This article reviews this relationship and provides recommendations for management. Keywords: Insomnia, sleep disorder, psychiatric disorder, depression, psychosis, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder Insomnia affects 25 million people in the United States annually and leads to an estimated $100 billion health care burden. Insomnia has also been shown to be a causal factor in other medical and psychiatric disorders, cognitive impairments, accidents, absenteeism, and reduced quality of life.1 The cost of not treating insomnia is more than the cost of treating insomnia.2 Insomnia as a symptom is seen in up to one third of the Un...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review anxiety disorder depression insomnia psychiatric disorder psychosis schizophrenia sleep disorder Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
You're reading Your Guide To Better Sleep Habits, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nothing can be more frustrating than laying on bed at night and waiting for sleep that won't come. There are many reasons why you're having a hard time dozing off. You may be suffering from insomnia, experiencing immense stress or practicing unhealthy lifestyle habits. It's also possible that you have an underlying medical condition that affects your ability to get good sleep. According to the sleep experts at National Slee...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement good habits good sleep health benefits of sleep pickthebrain sleep habit Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
I often hear the question: “Is overeating the same as binge eating?” This is an understandable question, given that “overeating” and “binging” are terms that you hear frequently in the media or in casual day-to-day conversations. It’s common to use these terms interchangeably, however mental health professionals define them differently. Overeating is a behavior that everyone does from time to time. Binge eating is quite different. People who engage in frequent binge eating can struggle with isolation, depression and low self-worth. Additionally, their pattern of eating may have a ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Health-related Self-Esteem Anorexia Nervosa Binge Eating Disorder Bingeing binging Bulimia Nervosa Depression dieting Guilt Nutrition overeating Remorse snacking Source Type: blogs
Here’s a question I hear on occasion: “I started the prebiotic fibers but I experienced a lot of bloating and abdominal discomfort and had to stop. Maybe they’re not for me.” As the Wheat Belly conversation is taken further into the mainstream population via the Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, I am hearing this more and more. Giving up too soon because of encountering a problem without understanding why is a sure way to booby-trap your return to health. Should you encounter problems such as bloating or discomfort with your prebiotic regimen, it is due to dysbiosis, disrupted bowel flora from prior e...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora cholesterol dysbiosis health hypertension Inflammation prebiotic fibers resistant starch Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Rebecca shared her photos and experience living the Wheat Belly lifestyle: “Eliminating wheat has made such a huge difference in my health and, surprisingly, my appearance. I am 42 and have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. I’m also a single mom of four and was told that it was ‘normal’ for me to be tired. But I was miserable. I was so tired it hurt despite having thyroid levels that were in the normal range. I also had brain ‘fog,’ anxiety, depression, and trouble sleeping. Doctor after doctor kept prescribing me more medicine: medicine for my mood, medicine to help me sleep. And despite a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories anti-aging anxiety Armour autoimmune Depression hashimoto's hypothyroid Inflammation insomnia leaky gut sleep Weight Loss youth Source Type: blogs
Steve’s wife, Jenny, shared these photos of her husband feeling well off all wheat and grains, then after a wheat exposure: “Went to a party last night. Thought he could have pizza since he’s looked so good for so long. This is him before and after.” Of course, Steve will survive after enduring some misery and perhaps embarrassment. But the whole business of re-exposure to wheat and related grains can be quite nasty. Among the most common wheat/grain re-exposure reactions are: Abdominal distress–bloating, diarrhea, discomfort, even severe acute pain Joint pain–in fingers and wrists, as ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle diarrhea gluten grain Inflammation joint pain re-exposure reactions skin rash Source Type: blogs
The long commute has become a staple of the American work experience: The average round-trip commute is close to an hour and at least 10 percent of the workforce spends more than an hour getting to work. In all likelihood, if you're employed, you knew that; heck, you live that. What you might not have known though is how much commuting ages you -- whether it's done by private automobile or public transit. Here are a few ways commuting may be shaving years off your life: 1. It's stressful. A 2014 report from the U.K.’s Office of National Statistics found that people with commutes of more than 30 minutes each way had...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
00:00 to 02.26—Dr. Bihari gives his background and credentials. Dr. Bihari: My medical training started at Harvard Medical School. I graduated in 1957. Then I trained in Internal Medicine at one of the Harvard teaching hospitals in Boston, Beth Israel, and then in Neurology at Massachusetts General in Boston. Then I went to the National Institutes of Health for two years doing brain physiology—brain research. I did another residency training in Psychiatry in New York, at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and then, over the following five or six years, I got very involved in working in Drug Addiction. By 197...
Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anecdotal Treatments HONEST MEDICINE Integrative Medicine Low Dose Naltrexone Obituaries Source Type: blogs
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