Soaking In Hot Tub Could Be Beneficial For Women Suffering From PCOS

BOSTON (CBS) – Researchers from the University of Oregon studied six women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and found that when they soaked in a hot tub for one hour three to four times a week they experienced a variety of health benefits. After two months, the women had reduced resistance to insulin, lower blood pressure and heart rate and some even had more regular menstrual cycles and clearer skin. PCOS affects about 10% of women of reproductive age. It causes multiple cysts to form on the ovaries and also increases a woman’s risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and infertility. The researchers say the hot tub soaks may reduce inflammation, improve metabolism and help improve blood flow, but more research is needed before you decide to go jump in a hot tub to improve your health.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

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Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Authors: Lazaridou S, Dinas K, Tziomalos K Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. PCOS is not only the leading cause of anovulatory infertility but is also associated with an array of metabolic disorders, among which impaired glucose metabolism has been a topic of intense research. The aim of the present narrative review is to summarize the findings of the studies that have evaluated the prevalence and incidence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients with PCOS, to analyze the factors underpinning the association between T2DM ...
Source: Hormones - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Hormones (Athens) Source Type: research
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most frequent endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, affecting 4%-10% of the population. It is a complex disorder classically characterized by chronic oligo- or anovulation, polycystic ovaries, and hyperandrogenism. It is also associated with a number of comorbid conditions, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, obesity, infertility, and breast and endometrial cancer [1,2]. In addition, psychiatric disorders are observed more often in PCOS patients than in the general population, particularly depressive, anxiety, and eating disorders [3 –6].
Source: Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Neuroradiology / Neuroradiologie Source Type: research
Prolonged sedentary time is associated with increased risk for cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the general population, regardless of physical activity status (1). Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common cause of infertility, has well-established long-term metabolic risks, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance plays a central role in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Behavioral and lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise constitute primary treatment modalities for promoting fertility and reducing long-term health risks.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster Presentation Source Type: research
Conclusions. Bariatric surgery has been shown to conclusively improve life expectancy, quality of life, and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. However, further research is required to identify whether weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in fertility of women with PCOS and to investigate which operation has the best results. PMID: 27965894 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders and Weight Management Tags: J Obes Source Type: research
Abstract Androgen excess in women is associated with metabolic dysfunction (obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)) and reproductive dysfunction (polycystic ovaries, amenorrhea, dysregulated gonadotropin release, and infertility). We sought to identify the effects of androgen excess on glucose metabolic dysfunction and the specific mechanisms of action by which androgens are inducing pathology. We developed a mouse model that displayed pathophysiological serum androgen levels with normal body mass/composition to ensure that the phenotypes were directly from andro...
Source: Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Endocrinology Source Type: research
DiscussionPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 6-8% of reproductive-age women making it the most common endocrinopathy in this age group. There is no consensus on the specific diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents as many of the characteristics overlap with normal adolescent physiology. However, patients should have evidence of hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhea, and potentially polycystic ovaries. PCOS has a genetic component although a specific gene has not been identified. Incidence of PCOS is 20-40% for a woman with a family history. Hyperandrogenism Androgen levels change during puberty therefore actual ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common ovarian disorder associated with androgen excess in women, which justifies the growing interest of endocrinologists. This syndrome leads to clinical hyperandrogenism and/or a biological dysovulation and infertility. Its diagnosis is based on consensual diagnostic criteria, but which are likely to change in the near future with the rise of the interest of new markers such as AMH. Diagnostic tools of PCOS are also discussed, with emphasis on the laboratory evaluation of androgens and other potential biomarkers of ovarian and metabolic dysfunctions. The exa...
Source: Annales de Biologie Clinique - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Ann Biol Clin (Paris) Source Type: research
Authors: Unfer V, Nestler JE, Kamenov ZA, Prapas N, Facchinetti F Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder, with complex etiology and pathophysiology, which remains poorly understood. It affects about 5-10% of women of reproductive age who typically suffer from obesity, hyperandrogenism, ovarian dysfunction, and menstrual irregularity. Indeed, PCOS is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility in industrialized nations, and it is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increased cardiovascular risk. Although insulin resistance is not included as a crit...
Source: International Journal of Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Int J Endocrinol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: PCOS may be associated with long-term adverse metabolic and endometrial consequences. Timely diagnosis and appropriate monitoring and management should be emphasized in order to prevent these women from adverse long-term complications. Oral contraceptives in combination with metformin reversed endometrial atypical hyperplasia in the obese, progestin-resistant woman with PCOS. Further clinical studies may be needed to confirm the effectiveness of such treatment on endometrial atypia in obese, progestin-resistant women for fertility sparing. PMID: 27424378 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: J Reprod Med Source Type: research
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