Oral and sublingual immunotherapy for egg allergy.

CONCLUSIONS: Frequent and increasing exposure to egg over one to two years in people who are allergic to egg builds tolerance, with almost everyone becoming more tolerant compared with a minority in the control group and almost half of people being totally tolerant of egg by the end of treatment compared with 1 in 10 people who avoid egg. However, nearly all who received treatment experienced adverse events, mainly allergy-related. We found that 1 in 12 children had serious allergic reactions requiring adrenaline, and some people gave up oral immunotherapy. It appears that oral immunotherapy for egg allergy is effective, but confidence in the trade-off between benefits and harms is low; because there was a small number of trials with few participants, and methodological problems with some trials. PMID: 29676439 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 7 July 2018Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Na'ama Epstein-Rigbi, Michael R. Goldberg, Michael B. Levy, Liat Nachshon, Arnon ElizurBackgroundOral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergy is demanding but data on patients' quality of life (QOL) throughout the process are limited.ObjectiveTo characterize changes in QOL of food-allergic patients during and after OIT.MethodsIn a prospective cohort study, the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire—Parental Form (FAQLQ-PF) was administered to parents of 191 consecutive children aged 4 to 12 yea...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Arasi S, Caminiti L, Crisafulli G, Pajno GB Abstract INTRODUCTION: IgE-mediated food allergy (FA) has been emerging as a public health priority. It is a potentially life-threatening condition with negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their family and its prevalence is increasing in westernized countries in the recent two decades. The current standard approach to FA consists of the strict avoidance of the triggering food. However, an elimination diet may be difficult and frustrating, above all for those foods (e.g. milk and egg) that are pivotal in the common diet. Oral immunotherapy (OIT)...
Source: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Expert Rev Clin Immunol Source Type: research
AbstractAllergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only currently available immune-modifying and aetiological treatment for patients suffering from IgE-mediated diseases. In childhood, it represents a suitable therapeutic option to intervene during the early phases of respiratory allergic diseases such as rhino-conjunctivitis and asthma, which is when their progression may be more easily influenced. A growing body of evidence shows that oral immunotherapy represents a promising treatment option in children with persistent IgE- mediated food allergy. The efficacy of AIT is under investigation also in patients with extrinsic atopic...
Source: Italian Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewAlthough evidence supports a beneficial effect of allergen immunotherapy on the symptoms of allergic respiratory disease and food allergy, it is not clear whether immunotherapy modifies the natural history of these conditions.Recent FindingsIn aeroallergen immunotherapy, studies suggest that prevention of asthma can be attained. Less evident is the ability of immunotherapy to prevent new allergen sensitizations and more studies are needed to test whether immunotherapy can continue suppressing airway symptoms after treatment discontinuation. In food allergen immunotherapy, there is evidence that unr...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 7 July 2018Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Na'ama Epstein-Rigbi, Michael R. Goldberg, Michael B. Levy, Liat Nachshon, Arnon ElizurAbstractBackgroundOral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergy is demanding but data on patients’ quality of life (QOL) throughout the process is limited.ObjectiveTo characterize changes in QOL of food-allergic patients during and following OIT.MethodsIn a prospective cohort study the FAQLQ-Parental Form (FAQLQ-PF) was administered to parents of 191 consecutive children aged 4-12 years, undergoing OIT for food al...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Joan H. Dunlop, Corinne A. Keet
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 7 July 2018Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Na'ama Epstein-Rigbi, Michael R. Goldberg, Michael B. Levy, Liat Nachshon, Arnon ElizurAbstractBackgroundOral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergy is demanding but data on patients’ quality of life (QOL) throughout the process is limited.ObjectiveTo characterize changes in QOL of food-allergic patients during and following OIT.MethodsIn a prospective cohort study the FAQLQ-Parental Form (FAQLQ-PF) was administered to parents of 191 consecutive children aged 4-12 years, undergoing OIT for food al...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Joan H. Dunlop, Corinne A. Keet
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractFood allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved curative therapy. A number of food allergen immunotherapies are being investigated in phase II/III trials; however, these are limited in their ability to restore immune tolerance to food allergens and often result in high rates of allergic side effects, sometimes involving anaphylaxis, that may curtail their impact. A variety of adjunctive therapies have been developed in order to enhance the efficacy and/or improve the safety of food allergen immunotherapy through either shifting the immune response from a Th2 polarized response to a Th1 and...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract The prevalence of food allergy in the pediatric population, specifically to peanuts, has been rising. Accidental exposure to peanuts in a person who is allergic may have life-threatening consequences. Previous recommendations regarding peanut allergy included a delay in introduction of peanut to infants. However, more recent studies have provided sufficient contrary evidence supporting early introduction of peanuts for prevention of peanut allergy. Therefore, prompt evaluation by a specialist should be considered in infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy. Current treatment is strict avoidance o...
Source: Pediatric Annals - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Ann Source Type: research
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