Hepatitis C-infected Heart and Lung Transplants Safe Hepatitis C-infected Heart and Lung Transplants Safe

Organs donated from people infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted, and any transmission of the virus can be treated with antiretrovirals, new research shows.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

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The new transplant policy calls for recipients to receive hepatitis C antivirals starting a few hours after leaving the operating room. This strategy could increase the number of potential organs available to patients by 20% to 25%, the lead researcher said.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Title: Lungs, Hearts Infected With Hepatitis C Still OK for TransplantCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/3/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/4/2019 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - Category: Nutrition Source Type: news
(Reuters Health) - The presence of hepatitis C in potential organ donors has long prevented hearts and lungs from going to patients who desperately need them, but that prohibition may soon disappear thanks to a technique that attacks the virus before it can gain a foothold in the recipient.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
A new study suggests doctors can safely transplant lungs or hearts from hepatitis C-positive donors without infecting the recipients
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 -- Patients in dire need of an organ transplant can safely receive a new heart or lung from donors who have hepatitis C, a new clinical trial has shown. By swiftly administering powerful antiviral drugs, doctors can prevent...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) In a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the team describes a four-week antiviral treatment regimen started within hours of organ transplantation surgery, preventing establishment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in all patients, and, in so doing, expanding the pool of eligible heart and lung donor organs.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
In pre-clinical studies we have demonstrated the ability of light-based therapies - UVC and photodynamic therapy (PDT) during EVLP to inactivate HCV in donor lungs. In a step-wise application of this technology to clinical transplantation, we designed a clinical trial to evaluate to effects of UVC treatment using NAT+ HCV donor lungs followed by transplantation.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 108 Source Type: research
Due to the shortage of donor hearts in the United States, it is essential we continuously evaluate strategies aimed at increasing donor organ availability. Our institution sought to expand the cardiac donor pool by utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive donor hearts. In a single center retrospective study, we examined the quality of HCV-positive donor hearts as compared to HCV-negative donor hearts.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 99 Source Type: research
Donor-derived hepatitis C infection (dd-HCV) infection may increase risk of renal impairment (RI) among heart transplant (HT) recipients. Sofosbuvir, an integral component of anti-HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), has also been linked to RI. To date, no prior study has examined the trends in renal function for HT recipients of dd-HCV infection, and assessed safety and efficacy of sofosbuvir-based DAAs.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 98 Source Type: research
With increasing organs available in light of the national opioid epidemic and the availability of direct acting-antiviral (DAA) therapy for Hepatitis C virus (HCV), HCV antibody (Ab)+ organs serve as an important potential supply to the donor pool. We sought to examine trends over time in the utilization of HCV Ab+ organs both nationally and regionally.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 97 Source Type: research
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