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EMS Physicians Gather on Capitol Hill to Address Critical Drug Shortages Affecting Patient Care

WASHINGTON, DC (April 16, 2018) – Members of the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) gathered in Washington, D.C. last week to advocate for issues affecting quality out-of-hospital emergency medical care, including ongoing drug shortages affecting EMS providers. Medical facilities across the country are currently experiencing shortages in powerful, injectable painkillers as well as other essential emergency medications needed by patients undergoing surgery, fighting cancer or suffering traumatic injuries. The shortage is due largely to manufacturing setbacks. “Drug shortages impede our nation’s ability to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies,” said Brent Myers, NAEMSP president. “In a public health emergency, EMS providers must have resuscitative fluids, pain relief medications and drugs that facilitate airway management. Unfortunately, many of these life-saving medications continue to be in shortage, at times dangerously so.” The group also discussed, at its annual Government Relations Academy (GRA) on Tuesday, April 10, the reauthorization of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act (PAHPA), which effectively addresses the development and maintenance of medical countermeasures to address chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats. NAEMSP plans to propose amendments to the reauthorization of PAHPA, designed to address drug shortages and the consequential gap in EMS services. The GRA provides...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

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WASHINGTON, DC (April 16, 2018) – Members of the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) gathered in Washington, D.C. last week to advocate for issues affecting quality out-of-hospital emergency medical care, including ongoing drug shortages affecting EMS providers. Medical facilities across the country are currently experiencing shortages in powerful, injectable painkillers as well as other essential emergency medications needed by patients undergoing surgery, fighting cancer or suffering traumatic injuries. The shortage is due largely to manufacturing setbacks. “Drug shortages impede our nation&rsqu...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news
It was pouring rain. I could barely see as I drove up the winding mountains. But I would not be deterred from my mission. I was on my way to finally meet Jamaica’s last living Maroon healer, Ivey Harris. I finally arrived at her secluded mountain home and she met me with open arms… and an umbrella. After the rain let up, she showed me around her home. Her yard is like an all-natural pharmacy. And she’s a walking herbal encyclopedia. One of my favorites was a Jamaican vine with weird-looking warty green fruit. Most people in the U.S. would call it a weed. Today, I grow it in my backyard here in South F...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Avandia blood sugar diabetes diabetics drug glucose high-carb insulin Source Type: news
Have you ever thought that it would be possible to monitor drug overdoses, Zika cases or the spread of the flu in real time? Have you ever imagined that satellites wouldbe able to tell how and where a malaria epidemic will happen months before the actual outbreak? It is mind-blowing how, in the last years, digital maps developed to a level where they serve as effective tools for evaluating, monitoring and even predicting health events. That’s why I decided to give a comprehensive overview of digital maps in healthcare. John Snow, cholera and the revolution of maps in healthcare Before Game of Thrones monopolized Joh...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Mobile Health digital health digital technology epidemics epidemiology gc4 Innovation interactive maps Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D. and Alexandrea Adams The recent commemoration of National Women’s Health Week provided an important time to mark the progress that has been made in advancing women’s health over the past two decades and to highlight what more needs to be done to achieve women’s health equity in America. Historically, women have experienced discrimination in health care despite making 80 percent of health care decisions for their families, using more medical services than men, and suffering greater disability from chronic disease. Before the mid 1990’s, women were often excluded as subjects ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democrat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Jovia, who died on Apr. 29, 2016, suffered from both HIV/AIDS and cervical cancer, a deadly combination affecting thousands of women in Uganda. Credit: Amy Fallon/IPSBy Amy FallonKAMPALA, Uganda, Jul 25 2016 (IPS)Lying on a dirty bed in a crowded, squalid hostel in Kampala, emaciated Jovia, 29, managed a weak smile as a doctor delivered her a small green bottle containing a liquid.“I’m so happy they’ve brought the morphine,” the mother told IPS, just about the only words she could get out during what would be the last weeks of her life. “It controls my pain and makes my life more bearable.&rdq...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Inequity Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health Cancer HIV/AIDS Hospice Africa Uganda Source Type: news
Researchers have discovered a direct link between low vitamin D3 levels and insulin resistance, pre-diabetes and full-blown type 2 diabetes.1 The study, which came out of Harbin Medical University in China, also revealed that even with a minor vitamin D3 deficiency, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases by 91%.2 I’m not surprised. It’s a connection I’ve seen with my patients for many years at the Sears Institute for Anti-Aging Medicine. Diabetes can be prevented — and conquered — through the healing power of vitamin D3. This fat-soluble vitamin is one of the core “primal&rd...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: news
by Tom QuinnIn case you didn’t notice, the US Centers for Disease Control published their long-awaited (dreaded?) “CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.” It made a pretty big splash: Five editorials plus the full Guideline in the online Mar 15 JAMA, front page New York Times feature article, the first hour on NPR’s “Diane Rehm Show,” (Mar 17) and multiple others. It is specifically aimed at primary care prescribers, who write about half of the scripts for opioids in the US. It is intended to “support clinicians caring for patients outside the context of active can...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: CDC ethics opioids pain quinn The profession Source Type: blogs
Today’s TBT post ran over two years ago and addressed female dysfunction. Given the FDA’s recent approval of flibanserin, a pill that aims to increase a woman’s desire for sex, we thought it would be helpful to review some of the early conversations on the issue. A recent article published in partnership with The Investigative Fund and Newsweek questioned the existence of “female dysfunction,” as if to say, who cares about women’s sexual health? If you can’t “see” it, apparently it doesn’t exist. This is one-sided, inaccurate and disparaging of women. Why is it th...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Aging Choice gender Women's Health Flibanserin Food and Drug Administration Sexual desire Sexual dysfunction Source Type: blogs
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