Skin banking at a regional burns centre —The way forward

Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018 Source:Burns Author(s): Sunil Manohar Keswani, Mukesh Gopinath Mishra, Shilpa Karnik, Shruti Dutta, Mamata Mishra, Sangita Panda, Reshmi Varghese, Tanvi Virkar, Vaishna Upendran In India approximately 1 million people get burnt every year and most of them are from the lower or middle income strata. Therefore it is obligatory to find out an economic way of treatment for the affected populace. Since use of human skin allograft is the gold standard for the treatment of burn wound, in-house skin banking for a burn unit hospital is prerequisite to make the treatment procedure affordable. Although, there was one skin bank at India till 2009, but it was difficult for a single bank to cover the entire country’s need. Looking at the necessities, National Burns Centre (a tertiary burn care centre) along with Rotary International and Euro Skin Bank collaborated and developed an effective cadaveric skin banking model in Mumbai, Maharashtra in 2009. Initial two to three years were formation phase; by the year 2013 the entire system was organized and started running full fledged. The model has also been replicated in other states of India to accommodate the large burn population of the country. This paper therefore, gives a step by step account of how the bank evolved and its present status.
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

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In this study, scar development and maturation were assessed in a porcine full-thickness burn model with immediate excision and split-thickness autograft coverage. Red Duroc pigs were treated with split-thickness autografts of varying thickness: 0.026 in. (“thin”) or 0.058 in. (“thick”). Additionally, the thin skin grafts were meshed and expanded at 1:1.5 or 1:4 to evaluate the role of skin expansion in scar formation. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model resulted in thick, raised scars. Treatment with thick split-thickness skin grafts resulted in less contraction and reduced scarring ...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Burns, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Sunil Manohar Keswani, Mukesh Gopinath Mishra, Shilpa Karnik, Shruti Dutta, Mamata Mishra, Sangita Panda, Reshmi Varghese, Tanvi Virkar, Vaishna UpendranAbstractIn India approximately 1 million people get burnt every year and most of them are from the lower or middle income strata. Therefore it is obligatory to find out an economic way of treatment for the affected populace. Since use of human skin allograft is the gold standard for the treatment of burn wound, in-house skin banking for a burn unit hospital is prerequisite to make the treatment procedur...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is the first report investigating the long-term outcome of a newly developed BCSG. BCSGs demonstrated comparable results with patients’ autografts, functional outcomes on self-reported questionnaires and excellent psychological states. Precaution given the extensive unexpected hyperpigmentation must be taken and a randomized controlled study is underway.
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: Burns, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Alvin Wen Choong Chua, Yik Cheong Khoo, Thi Thu Ha Truong, Evan Woo, Bien Keem Tan, Si Jack ChongAbstractA 12-year retrospective review of severe burn patients who received cultured epithelial autografts (CEA) at the Singapore General Hospital Burns Centre from January 2005 to December 2016 was carried out. During this period, two different surgical modalities were employed to manage these burn injuries. In the earlier period, following early excision of the burn wounds, exposed surfaces were covered with a combination of split thickness skin autograf...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The Hamilton-DONATE pilot study supports the feasibility of a larger cohort study to describe the epidemiology and clinical practices related to deceased donor care in Canada. TRIAL REGISTRATION: wwwclinicaltrials.gov (NCT02902783). Registered 16 September 2016. PMID: 29987806 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Can J Anaesth Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is the first report investigating the long-term outcome of a newly developed BCSG. BCSGs demonstrated comparable results with patients’ autografts, functional outcomes on self-reported questionnaires and excellent psychological states. Precaution given the extensive unexpected hyperpigmentation must be taken and a randomized controlled study is underway.
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: Burns, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Alvin Wen Choong Chua, Yik Cheong Khoo, Thi Thu Ha Truong, Evan Woo, Bien Keem Tan, Si Jack ChongAbstractA 12-year retrospective review of severe burn patients who received cultured epithelial autografts (CEA) at the Singapore General Hospital Burns Centre from January 2005 to December 2016 was carried out. During this period, two different surgical modalities were employed to manage these burn injuries. In the earlier period, following early excision of the burn wounds, exposed surfaces were covered with a combination of split thickness skin autograf...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
In this study, scar development and maturation were assessed in a porcine full-thickness burn model with immediate excision and split-thickness autograft coverage. Red Duroc pigs were treated with split-thickness autografts of varying thickness: 0.026 in. (“thin”) or 0.058 in. (“thick”). Additionally, the thin skin grafts were meshed and expanded at 1:1.5 or 1:4 to evaluate the role of skin expansion in scar formation. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model resulted in thick, raised scars. Treatment with thick split-thickness skin grafts resulted in less contraction and reduced scarring ...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Burns, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Sunil Manohar Keswani, Mukesh Gopinath Mishra, Shilpa Karnik, Shruti Dutta, Mamata Mishra, Sangita Panda, Reshmi Varghese, Tanvi Virkar, Vaishna UpendranAbstractIn India approximately 1 million people get burnt every year and most of them are from the lower or middle income strata. Therefore it is obligatory to find out an economic way of treatment for the affected populace. Since use of human skin allograft is the gold standard for the treatment of burn wound, in-house skin banking for a burn unit hospital is prerequisite to make the treatment procedur...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The extensive upper and lower eyelid defects with large vertical component can be successfully repaired using ADA as a tarsal substitute. The results of our study with long-term follow-up indicate excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes with minimal morbidity.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
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