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Effect of skin graft thickness on scar development in a porcine burn model

In this study, scar development and maturation were assessed in a porcine full-thickness burn model with immediate excision and split-thickness autograft coverage. Red Duroc pigs were treated with split-thickness autografts of varying thickness: 0.026in. (“thin”) or 0.058in. (“thick”). Additionally, the thin skin grafts were meshed and expanded at 1:1.5 or 1:4 to evaluate the role of skin expansion in scar formation. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model resulted in thick, raised scars. Treatment with thick split-thickness skin grafts resulted in less contraction and reduced scarring as well as improved biomechanics. Thin skin autograft expansion at a 1:4 ratio tended to result in scars that contracted more with increased scar height compared to the 1:1.5 expansion ratio. All treatment groups showed Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression that increased over time and peaked 4 weeks after grafting. Burns treated with thick split-thickness grafts showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes 1 week after grafting, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and TGF-β1, compared to wounds treated with thin split-thickness grafts. Overall, the burn-excise-autograft model using split-thickness autograft meshed and expanded to 1:1.5 or 1:4, resulted in thick, raised scars similar in appearance and structure to human hypertrophic scars. This model can be used in future studies to stu...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 27 March 2018 Source:Burns Author(s): Takayuki Yamamoto, Hayato Iwase, Timothy W. King, Hidetaka Hara, David K.C. Cooper Half a million patients in the USA alone require treatment for burns annually. Following an extensive burn, it may not be possible to provide sufficient autografts in a single setting. Pig skin xenografts may provide temporary coverage. However, preformed xenoreactive antibodies in the human recipient activate complement, and thus result in rapid rejection of the graft. Because burn patients usually have some degree of immune dysfunction and are therefore at increased ...
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Conclusion This is the first report investigating the long-term outcome of a newly developed BCSG. BCSGs demonstrated comparable results with patients’ autografts, functional outcomes on self-reported questionnaires and excellent psychological states. Precaution given the extensive unexpected hyperpigmentation must be taken and a randomized controlled study is underway.
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Marjolin' s ulcer, an aggressive ulcerating squamous cell carcinoma, is a well-known phenomenon that occurs in chronically inflamed or scarred tissue; however, squamous cell carcinoma arising in the acute setting after tissue trauma - specifically autograft donor harvest sites for burns - is a rare, but notable event.
Source: International Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: It is feasible to create a skin bank in a country with no tradition of allograft skin use. Long-term sustainability now depends on spreading awareness and education in the Kathmandu Valley to overcome religious and cultural barriers that have hindered donor recruitment. Our low-cost and high-impact skin bank provides a model to expand this system to other hospitals both within Nepal and beyond.
Source: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Special Topic Source Type: research
Abstract AbstractMore than half of individuals experiencing major thermal burn injury (MThBI) receive an autologous skin graft (autograft), in which skin is removed from a healthy “donor” site and transplanted to the burn site. Persistent pain and itch at the graft site are major causes of suffering and disability in MThBI survivors. African Americans have a higher risk of MThBI, and in other clinical settings African Americans experience a greater burden of pain and itch relative to European Americans. However, to our knowledge, ethnic differences in skin graft site pain and itch outcomes after MThBI have not ...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Abstract The importance of skin to survival, and the devastating physical and psychological consequences of scarring following reparative healing of extensive or difficult to heal human wounds, cannot be disputed. We discuss the significant challenges faced by patients and healthcare providers alike in treating these wounds. New state of the art technologies have provided remarkable insights into the role of skin stem and progenitor cells and their niches in maintaining skin homeostasis and in reparative wound healing. Based on this knowledge, we examine different approaches to repair extensive burn injury and chr...
Source: Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Adv Drug Deliv Rev Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to review the incidence of skin allograft discard and bacterial contamination due to donor bioburden at the Ontario Professional Firefighters Skin Bank over a 14-year period. We sought to determine whether modifications to our prerecovery donor preparation process have been effective in reducing skin bioburden and identify other potential risk factors of allograft contamination. A retrospective review of all skin donors (n = 259) processed from 2002 to 2015 was performed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine whether donor-related factors and procurement-related factors were...
Source: Journal of Burn Care and Research - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusion There was better bio-performance, low immunogenicity and better dermal incorporation after treated by laser micro-pore drilling and decellularized deep II° burn-DADM, which may be considered as a better substitute for dermal matrix. Furthermore, the earlier harvested DADM after burn (24h) shows the better transplantation effect.
Source: Burns - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Over half of individuals experiencing major thermal burn injury (MThBI) receive an autologous skin graft (autograft), in which skin is removed from a healthy " donor " site and transplanted to the burn site. Persistent pain/itch at the graft site are major causes of suffering and disability in MThBI survivors. African Americans have a higher risk of MThBI, and in other clinical settings African Americans experience a greater burden of pain and itch relative to European Americans. However, to our knowledge, ethnic differences in skin graft site pain/itch outcomes after MThBI have not been assessed. We evaluated sk...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Vyas KS, Burns C, Ryan DT, Wong L Abstract A 41-year-old man with past medical history of kidney-liver transplantation requiring chronic immunosuppression presented 2 years posttransplant with a necrotizing soft tissue infection of his right thigh. Serial debridement to remove necrotic tissue was performed, and a Matrix HD Allograft Fenestrated (RTI Surgical, Alachua, FL) was applied. At 5-months post grafting, the patient demonstrated fully vascularized and intact skin. Under normal circumstances, a cadaveric allograft sloughs over several weeks and is not usually considered a permanent solution for wound...
Source: Wounds - Category: General Medicine Tags: Wounds Source Type: research
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