Ask D'Mine: On Meth Addiction with Diabetes

Got questions about life with diabetes? So do we! That's why we offer our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author Wil Dubois in New Mexico.This week, Wil takes on a serious question about drug use and...
Source: Diabetes Mine - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

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How can conventional dietary advice gotten it so wrong? Rather than eating plenty of “healthy whole grains,” people on the Wheat Belly lifestyle eat absolutely no grains and enjoy spectacular weight loss and reversal of hundreds of health conditions as a result. Unfortunately, many people view this as a “gluten-free” lifestyle which is incorrect. Here are 10 reasons why no bagels, pretzels, or sandwiches made from wheat flour should ever cross human lips. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle Gliadin gluten Inflammation Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
There are plenty of reasons to never allow a bagel, sandwich, or pretzels to cross your lips again. But here are the top 10 most powerful and compelling reasons to tell the USDA and other providers of dietary advice to bug off with their “healthy whole grains” nonsense. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related proteins from rye, barley, and corn. This is a big part of the reason why grains make you gain weight. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides are mind active drugs that trigger behavioral outbursts in kids ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation joint pain low-carb wheat belly Source Type: blogs
There’s an argument that has been batted around in online conversations, one that I thought that, because it was so patently absurd and so readily disproven, it would simply disappear into the blogosphere . . . but it hasn’t. So let’s talk about this idea. The idea goes like this: Because glyphosate is liberally applied to wheat, including its application as a desiccant and for weed control pre-planting, during maturation, and pre-harvest, the high concentrations of this herbicide in wheat products are the cause for all the problems that emerge with wheat consumption. It means that, minus glyphosate, whea...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates gluten-free glyphosate grain-free grains Inflammation roundup undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III, the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle, Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Free Market health economics Libertarian Source Type: blogs
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first thi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Source Type: blogs
We present the case of an 80-year-old woman, single with no children, who lived alone, and, up until presentation, was able to perform activities of daily living self-sufficiently. She reported to have the support of friends and neighbors, and she lived in the small community of São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal. She had completed two years of college before dropping out during her third year, and her last job was as an elder care-worker. She had no personal or family psychiatric antecedents and no history of alcohol or illicit drug addictions. The patient was diagnosed with DM2 two years previously and was treate...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Report Current Issue acute confusional state delirium diabetes hyperglycemia psychosis Source Type: research
Cocaine and other drugs of abuse hijack the natural reward circuits in the brain. In part, that's why it's so hard to quit using these substances. Moreover, relapse rates hover between 40 and 60 percent, similar to rates for other chronic conditions like hypertension and Type 1 diabetes. University of Pennsylvania behavioral pharmacologist and neuroscientist Heath Schmidt studies how long-term exposure to drugs such as cocaine, nicotine, and prescription opioids affects the brain and how these changes promote relapse in someone who has kicked the habit.
Source: World Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news
The opioid epidemic of the last 20 years has served to illustrate the powerful addictive properties of anything that binds to opioid receptors of the human brain. Lives are ruined by opioid addiction, more than 100 deaths now occurring every day from overdose as people either take more and more to overcome the partial tolerance or new potent drugs like fentanyl make their way into street versions. Drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and fentanyl bind to the brain’s opioid receptors provoking a “high” while causing the user to desire more opioids as partial tolerance develops. And make no mistake: Much o...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle addiction addictive eating disorder opiates opioids undoctored Source Type: blogs
This study was widely covered in the press, and many of the sound bites and headlines reporting the two treatments to be equally effective were a bit misleading. The advantages and disadvantages of buprenorphine (Suboxone, Subutex, Zubsolv, Probuphine, Sublocade) Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist medication. This medication activates the same receptors in the brain as any opioid, but only partly. Because its effects are long-lasting, it can be taken once a day to relieve cravings, prevent withdrawal, and restore normal functioning in someone with opioid use disorder. Because it is a partial agonist, it has a ceilin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health Source Type: blogs
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