Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy for OCD

This article titled “Common Pitfalls in Exposure and Response prevention (EX/RP) for OCD” by Seth J. Gillihan was published in the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in May 2012 and discusses various mistakes that well-meaning therapists might make while using ERP therapy. For example, some therapists don’t encourage their clients to go far enough in their exposures — to do what is most difficult for them. Other therapists might choose the wrong type of exposures, or even interfere with proper therapy by encouraging the use of distraction. Some other topics discussed in the article, which I highly recommend reading, include providing reassurance, treating peripheral symptoms and not the core fear, and ineffectively handling mental compulsions. Dr. Gillihan’s analysis demonstrates how important it is to work with experienced therapists who truly understand the complexities of OCD and ERP. Also, ERP Therapy, like OCD, is often misrepresented by the media and misunderstood by the general public. Reality shows where patients are asked to do things such as licking toilet seats do more harm than good. Someone with OCD who is already apprehensive about beginning treatment will surely stay away after seeing this portrayal. We need to present accurate, quality information. Exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy is the evidence-based psychological therapy recommended by the American Psychological Association for the treatment of ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Caregivers Family Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment anxious thoughts Avoidance Desensitization exposure Exposure Response Prevention Therapy Obsessions Ocd Rituals Source Type: news

Related Links:

Authors: Hezel DM, Simpson HB Abstract Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by distressing thoughts and repetitive behaviors that are interfering, time-consuming, and difficult to control. Although OCD was once thought to be untreatable, the last few decades have seen great success in reducing symptoms with exposure and response prevention (ERP), which is now considered to be the first-line psychotherapy for the disorder. Despite these significant therapeutic advances, there remain a number of challenges in treating OCD. In this review, we will describe the theoretical underpinnings and elements of ...
Source: Indian Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Indian J Psychiatry Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The current study thus replicated previous research suggesting the relevance of the feared possible self in psychological disorders such as OCD, where negative self-perception is a dominant theme. PRACTITIONER POINTS: Current results suggest that changes in feared self-perceptions may be the mechanism through which OCD symptoms improve via therapy. Interventions specifically aimed at changing feared self-perceptions may prove effective in improving cognitive-behavioural treatments for OCD. One limitation of the current study is the lack of behavioural measures of OCD to supplement self-report measures of ...
Source: The British Journal of Clinical Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Br J Clin Psychol Source Type: research
If you can’t stop picking your skin, you may have a very common condition called skin picking disorder (SPD). We all pick at a scab or a bump from time to time, but for those with SPD, it can be nearly impossible to control those urges. Apart from the cosmetic impact of recurrent skin lesions and scarring, SPD can lead to serious infections, shame, depression, and anxiety. You may be feeling alone or embarrassed, but you should know that this condition affects at least five million Americans. A diagnosis of SPD, also known as excoriation disorder, is made when there are repeated attempts to stop picking, and the skin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Source Type: blogs
Authors: Philipp R, Kriston L, Lanio J, Kühne F, Härter M, Moritz S, Meister R Abstract We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of metacognitive interventions for mental disorders. We searched electronic databases and included randomized and non-randomized controlled trials comparing metacognitive interventions with other treatments in adults with mental disorders. Primary effectiveness and acceptability outcomes were symptom severity and dropout, respectively. We performed random-effects meta-analyses. We identified Metacognitive Training (MCTrain), Metacognitive Therapy (MCTherap) and Metacogni...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
We examined the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) as a complementary treatment option. In a prospective, bicentric, assessor-blinded, randomized, and actively controlled clinical trial, 125 patients with OCD and residual symptoms after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) were randomized to either an MBCT group (n = 61) or to a psychoeducational group (OCD-EP; n = 64) as an active control condition. At post-treatment, there was no significant benefit of MBCT over OCD-EP with the Yale-Brown-Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) as the primary outcome measure, but with the Obsessi...
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
If your child has obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), you know that this condition affects not only your child but also your entire family. The guidance that follows can help parents gain a better understanding of OCD, learn helpful strategies to support their children, and ease distress all around. What is obsessive-compulsive disorder? OCD typically includes uncontrollable, recurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions or rituals) that a child feels an urgent need to repeat again and again. For example, your child may repeat a grooming routine until he feels “just right.” A child may engage in c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
tric Disorders Abstract BACKGROUND: Placebo response appears to be increasing in antidepressant, antipsychotic and various internal medicine trials. A similar trend has been reported for OCD during 1989-1999. Placebo response is generally considered as the extent to which placebo treatment is associated with core symptom improvement. In this analysis we used Joinpoint regression to assess the time trend of both placebo response and placebo responder rates according to year of publication with no time restriction in OCD drug trials. METHOD: We included drug and/or psychotherapy trials vs. placebo from PubMed, ...
Source: Current Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Neuropharmacol Source Type: research
OCD Awareness Week 2018 has come and gone and there were many successful, informative events to help all those whose lives have been touched by obsessive-compulsive disorder. There was also attention paid to OCD through the national media, though I’m not sure if the two shows I watched/listened to were broadcasted because of OCD Awareness Week. While I think the productions both did a good job debunking the myths of OCD and illustrating what the disorder is all about (as much as you can without actually having OCD), I believe they were sorely lacking in one extremely important area — treatment. The first show ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Minding the Media OCD Personal Psychology Psychotherapy Stigma Treatment Source Type: blogs
A highly effective psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on how our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect our feelings and behavior. Traditional CBT treatment usually requires weekly 30- to 60-minute sessions over 12 to 20 weeks. A faster option now emerging is intensive CBT (I-CBT), which employs much longer sessions concentrated into a month, week, or weekend — or sometimes a single eight-hour session. CBT helps people learn tools to reframe different types of thinking, such as black-and-white thinking (I can’t do anything right) and emotional reasoning (I feel you dislike me, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: This study provides evidence that ego-dystonicity partially affects the association between alexithymia and obsessive-compulsions. Alexithymia and ego-dystonicity have a synergistic effect on the symptoms of OCD. Alexithymia in healthy participants associates to the OC symptoms only through ego-dystonicity. Targeting ego-dystonicity dimensions in psychotherapy would help improve the symptoms of OCD.Psychopathology
Source: Psychopathology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
More News: Men | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Parenting | Psychiatry | Psychology | Psychotherapy