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Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy for OCD

This article titled “Common Pitfalls in Exposure and Response prevention (EX/RP) for OCD” by Seth J. Gillihan was published in the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in May 2012 and discusses various mistakes that well-meaning therapists might make while using ERP therapy. For example, some therapists don’t encourage their clients to go far enough in their exposures — to do what is most difficult for them. Other therapists might choose the wrong type of exposures, or even interfere with proper therapy by encouraging the use of distraction. Some other topics discussed in the article, which I highly recommend reading, include providing reassurance, treating peripheral symptoms and not the core fear, and ineffectively handling mental compulsions. Dr. Gillihan’s analysis demonstrates how important it is to work with experienced therapists who truly understand the complexities of OCD and ERP. Also, ERP Therapy, like OCD, is often misrepresented by the media and misunderstood by the general public. Reality shows where patients are asked to do things such as licking toilet seats do more harm than good. Someone with OCD who is already apprehensive about beginning treatment will surely stay away after seeing this portrayal. We need to present accurate, quality information. Exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy is the evidence-based psychological therapy recommended by the American Psychological Association for the treatment of ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Caregivers Family Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment anxious thoughts Avoidance Desensitization exposure Exposure Response Prevention Therapy Obsessions Ocd Rituals Source Type: news

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I have previously written about the possible benefits of using virtual reality (VR) in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Now it seems that virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has more wide-reaching benefits and can help reduce momentary paranoia and anxiety, as well as improve social cognition in individuals with psychotic disorders. In a February 2018 study published in The Lancet (Psychiatry), researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of personalized virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy in 116 patients with a DSM IV-diagnosed psychotic disorder and paranoid...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic Anxiety and Panic Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Technology Treatment CBT Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Paranoia Psychosis Psychotic Disorder virtual reality Source Type: blogs
Authors: Jung HH, Chang WS, Kim SJ, Kim CH, Chang JW Abstract Obsessive compulsive disorder is a debilitating condition characterized by recurrent obsessive thoughts and compulsive reactions. A great portion of the obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) patients are managed successfully with psychiatric treatment such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, but more than 10% of patients are remained as nonresponder who needs neurosurgical treatments. These patients are potential candidates for the neurosurgical management. There had been various kind of operation, lesioning su...
Source: Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: J Korean Neurosurg Soc Source Type: research
Conclusion. The audio-digital recording method provides a useful second opinion that can affirm the need for a different treatment intervention in these anxious patients. A second live assessment would have required additional clinic time and added patient burden. The audio-digital recording method is less burdensome than live second opinion assessments and might have utility in both research and clinical practice settings. Keywords: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), anxiolytic medications, anxious symptoms, audio-digital recording, dual review, second opinions Anxiety symptoms are prevalent in most populations wher...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Original Research anxiolytic medications anxious symptoms audio-digital recording dual review Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) second opinions Source Type: research
Excessive hand washing, out of a fear of contamination or germs, is one of the most common and best-known examples of obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD. Though OCD can ’t be “cured,” symptoms can be significantly reduced through cognitive-behavioral therapy, a type of psychotherapy.Cognitive-behavioral therapy, or CBT, can be challenging for some people with OCD. Therapists may expose them to experiences that require them to directly confront their fears by performing tasks that cause anxiety or even disgust. For example, one effective treatment for excessive fears of contamination might involve putti...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Depression is the leading cause of disability in the United States among people ages 15 to 44. While there are many effective treatments for depression, first-line approaches such as antidepressants and psychotherapy do not work for everyone. In fact, approximately two-thirds of people with depression don’t get adequate relief from the first antidepressant they try. After 2 months of treatment, at least some symptoms will remain for these individuals, and each subsequent medication tried is actually less likely to help than the one prior. What can people with depression do when they do not respond to first-line treat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Mental Health Source Type: blogs
The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic Standards Manual, Edition V (2013) reports that between 2 and 6% of the general population have a hoarding disorder. Once considered a type of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), hoarding is now regarded as a serious clinical condition co-morbid with diagnoses of depression, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorders, attention deficit disorder, and sometimes psychosis given the delusional levels of denial that hoarders often present (Frost, Stekelee, Tolin, 2011). Hoarders engage in excessive acquisition of items, whether those items have real world value or not,...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anxiety Caregivers Children and Teens Essays Family Grief and Loss Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personality Psychodynamic Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Abuse Anxiety Disorder bullying Comorb Source Type: news
Washing hands needlessly dozens of times of day. Spending so much time perfecting schoolwork that it never gets turned in.These are typical behaviors for people with obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD, a lifelong illness marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair work performance, relationships and quality of life. OCD is most commonly treated with medication and a form of psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy. Unfortunately, cognitive behavioral therapy does not help everyone with OCD, and the treatment can be expensive and time-consuming.Now, UCLA researchers have developed a way t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
There is no question that having a child with obsessive-compulsive disorder affects the whole family. I’ve written before about how pediatric OCD results in disrupted routines, stressful social interactions for children, and poor job performance for parents. Elevated stress and anxiety levels, as well as feelings of frustration, anger, and sadness become the norm in a household dictated by OCD. I’ve also written about how important it is to get the right help as soon as possible. Even if parents or other caregivers think things are “not that bad,” the situation is likely worse than they imagine. Bec...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens OCD Psychology Psychotherapy Research Treatment Adolescence CBT Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Comorbidity Exposure and Response Prevention Obsessive Compulsive Disorder tic disorder Source Type: blogs
Despite the fact that many make light of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by poking fun at minor compulsions or obsessions, OCD is a very serious illness. For those who have it, it can be debilitating and disruptive, upsetting life in very serious and insurmountable ways. Everyday Mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully is for people who experience OCD at any level. Those who are newly diagnosed may benefit first from therapy before taking on this added tool. The book is also for professionals who treat patients with OCD, as well as for friends and family members of those diagnosed. T...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Book Reviews Cognitive-Behavioral Habits Mindfulness Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment help for ocd mindfulness for ocd treatment for ocd Source Type: news
There are many forms of art that can be used in therapy. Finger painting is one of the mediums that is fun and entertaining as clients explore their emotions through paint. While art does not always require a prompt, it can often serve as a means for helping client’s see their progress in therapy. One theme that can be used is before and after. Clients are asked to paint a picture of what their anxiety felt like before they began therapy. Most often they are experiencing a lot of distress. They often feel like something is wrong with them. They feel shame and/or embarrassment that they are unable to handle life&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Creativity Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration OCD Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Stories anxiety External locus of control Intrusive Thoughts Metaphor Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Symbolism Source Type: blogs
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