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Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 233

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 233. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: Who popularised museli? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet201504324'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink201504324')) Dr Maximilian Bircher-Benner (August 22, 1867 – January 24, 1939) was a Swiss physician with a keen interest in the benefits of nutrition to cure his patients. He came across a variation of muesli on a walking trip and later adopted the following recipe: Apples, “[t]wo or three small apples or one large one.” The whole apple was to be used, including skin, core, and pips. Nuts, either walnuts, almonds, or hazelnuts, one tablespoon. Rolled oats, one tablespoon, “previously soaked in 3 tablespoons water for 12 hours”. Lemon juice from half a lemon. Either cream and honey or sweetened condensed milk, 1 tablespoon. His idea met much criticism as “humans are not supposed to be herbivores” but a company called Somalon in 1959 after permission from the Bircher family manufactured a product called Birchermüesli, w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Bircher Bircher Museli Clare Stanton Ekbom syndrome II Ernest W Goodpasture Essex Lopresti Goodpastures disease hugo flecker irukandji irukandji syndrome jack barnes John Range Maximilian Bircher-Benner Pa Source Type: blogs

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Authors: Alemu A, Tamiru W, Nedi T, Shibeshi W Abstract Background: Pain and inflammation are the major health problems commonly treated with traditional remedies mainly using medicinal plants. Leonotis ocymifolia is one of such medicinal plants used in folkloric medicine of Ethiopia. However, the plant has not been scientifically evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the 80% methanol leaves extract of Leonotis ocymifolia using rodent models. Method: The central and peripheral analgesic effect of the extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg dose levels was ...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Authors: Sun K, Song X, Jia R, Yin Z, Zou Y, Li L, Yin L, He C, Liang X, Yue G, Cui Q, Yang Y Abstract Aim: Pain and inflammation are associated with many diseases in humans and animals. Galla Chinensis, a traditional Chinese medicine, has a variety of pharmacological properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Galla Chinensis through different animal models. Method: The analgesic activities were evaluated by hot-plate and writhing tests. The anti-inflammatory effects were assessed by ear edema, capillary permeability, and paw edema tests. The contents of ...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
69 y.o. female with severe kyphosis, scoliosis H/O recent compression Fx presents with right flank/abdominal pain. Big w/u by PCP and GI negative. On physical exam I note that PSIS is only a few finger breaths below her rib. Thinking that pain is mechanical in origin due to friction I bring her in and block two intercostal nerves with 100% pain relief for duration of bupivacaine. What would you next move be? Repeat block with steroid, consider surgical resection of rib? She has been on COT... Strange flank pain case
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: forums
“Sometimes I think I need a spare heart to feel all the things I feel.” — Sanober Khan I felt her agony and loneliness as if it were my own. Even as I write that sentence, my eyes well up and heaviness fills my heart. Then, I’m reminded to apply the advice I give others. My mom was a special person, a sensitive soul just like me. Actually, I’m so much like she was, yet so different. One of the differences between us is that I had an opportunity to observe her life’s challenges. I saw her challenges reflected within myself and made a conscious choice to find healthy ways to cope. You see,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Parenting Personal Publishers Self-Help Tiny Buddha Boundaries compassionate Emotions Empathy Feelings Highly Sensitive Person sensitive people Sensitivity Sympathy Source Type: blogs
Abstract Background: Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) is an autoimmune disease, which involves inflammation and tissue remodeling. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is a component of innate immune system and recently implicated in autoimmunity. This observation may indicate that PTX3 participates in the inflammatory process of TAO. Methods: All studies were performed on TAO patients and healthy controls (45: 28 in total). RNA-seq was used to detect differential gene expression of orbital adipose-connective tissue. Quantitative PCR was performed to verify the results. PTX3 protein in orbital adipose-connective tissues...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Conclusions: Cortical bone trajectory screws would provide similar outcomes compared to pedicle screws in posterior lumbar interbody fusion at one year after surgery, and this technique represents a reasonable alternative to pedicle screws. PMID: 29670905 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
In this study, we intended to find the effect of T-614 on the osteogenesis process. We detected osteogenesis markers and transcription factors associated with osteoblastic lineage and bone formation in the culture of mesenchymal stem cells which differentiate osteoblast. The contents and activity of alkaline phosphatase, levels of collagen type I and bone gla protein, and calcium nodule formation were increased significantly after T-614 treated. Meanwhile, the mRNAs expressions of Osterix and Dlx5 were also found to be increased significantly by real-time PCR. The changes of levels of phosphorylation of p38 and NF-κB...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: The comparison of clinical outcomes of arthroscopic footprint-preserving knotless single-row repair with the tear completion repair technique for articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) remains unclear. METHODS: A total of 68 patients diagnosed with articular-sided PTRCTs who underwent rotator cuff repair between December 2014 and June 2015 were included. Of the 68 patients, 30 received footprint-preserving knotless single-row repair (group 1) and 38 received the tear completion repair technique (group 2). Preoperative and postoperative assessments were compared. ...
Source: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) Source Type: research
Instead of becoming trapped under the skin, an ingrown eyelash may grow in the wrong direction, toward the eye. This is called trichiasis, and it can cause irritation, pain, and damage to the cornea. Injury, inflammation, or certain conditions may be responsible. Medical treatment is often necessary. Learn more here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news
The days of painful, or very painful!, BMBs, without sedation, blablablablaetcetcetc, are almost over…or so it seems. We may soon be able just to have a simple blood test, thanks to the work of a University of Kansas team that has developed a small plastic chip, the size of a credit card, which can yield the same information as a BMB. No pain, no discomfort. Nada. Just a blood test… You can read all about it in this Science Daily article: goo.gl/vDymjQ As someone who has always had painful BMBs, without sedation, I find this bit of news to be nothing short of FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffantastic!!!
Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll BMB bone marrow biopsy Source Type: blogs
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