Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 233

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 233. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: Who popularised museli? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet201504324'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink201504324')) Dr Maximilian Bircher-Benner (August 22, 1867 – January 24, 1939) was a Swiss physician with a keen interest in the benefits of nutrition to cure his patients. He came across a variation of muesli on a walking trip and later adopted the following recipe: Apples, “[t]wo or three small apples or one large one.” The whole apple was to be used, including skin, core, and pips. Nuts, either walnuts, almonds, or hazelnuts, one tablespoon. Rolled oats, one tablespoon, “previously soaked in 3 tablespoons water for 12 hours”. Lemon juice from half a lemon. Either cream and honey or sweetened condensed milk, 1 tablespoon. His idea met much criticism as “humans are not supposed to be herbivores” but a company called Somalon in 1959 after permission from the Bircher family manufactured a product called Birchermüesli, w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Bircher Bircher Museli Clare Stanton Ekbom syndrome II Ernest W Goodpasture Essex Lopresti Goodpastures disease hugo flecker irukandji irukandji syndrome jack barnes John Range Maximilian Bircher-Benner Pa Source Type: blogs

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Distal forearm fracture is the most common fracture in childhood. Patients with this type of injury suffer from meaningful pain after Emergency Department (ED) discharge. Previous studies demonstrated that short arm (below-the-elbow) casts perform as well ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a brief exercise protocol on Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-Third Edition (SCAT3) performance in amateur women athletes. DESIGN: Cross-over repeated-measures design. SETTING: Of...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: TBI Source Type: news
LUNG cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the UK, and symptoms may be difficult to spot in its early stages. These are the warning signs of the lung condition, including chest pain and coughing up blood.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018Source: Respiratory Physiology &NeurobiologyAuthor(s): Arunnjah Vivekanandarajah, Karen A. Waters, Rita MachaalaniAbstractCigarette smoking during pregnancy is the largest modifiable risk factor for adverse outcomes in the infant. Investigations have focused on the psychoactive component of cigarettes, nicotine. One proposed mechanism leading to adverse effects is the interaction between nicotine and its nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Much data has been generated over the past three decades on the effects of cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) on the expression of ...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionsCPAP can improve autonomic activity, which might be one mechanism to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases in OSA.
Source: Heart and Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
The Life Extension Advocacy Foundation volunteers recently published a long and interesting interview with Peter de Keizer, the researcher who led development of the FOXO4-p53 approach to selective destruction of senescent cells. As senescence cells cause aging and age-related disease, there is considerable interest in developing means to remove them, and thus produce rejuvenation. The FOXO4-DRI used in de Keizer's study is probably the best of the current crop of senolytic compounds, as while the degree to which it kills senescent cells is broadly similar to the others, the evidence to date suggests that it produces insig...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This report argues that thousands of predominately-male patients are being made to suffer in pain and, in rare cases, are at risk of death due to the NHS restricting access to groin hernia operations. The research findings, produced in conjunction with the British Hernia Society reveals that 57 per cent of clinical commissioning groups are denying patients quick access to the procedure. This is despite the fact that the only curative treatment for patients with a groin hernia is surgery
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Medications to treat children with rheumatic disease include disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticosteroids, and biologic response modifiers that target mediators and cells involved in autoimmunity and inflammation. Although usually well-tolerated, such medications have many possible side effects, of which primary care and emergency providers should be aware. Both disease and immunosuppression contribute to susceptibility to unusual and opportunistic infections, in addition to usual childhood infections for which these children should receive all applicable nonlive vaccines. Close coordination between the rheu...
Source: Pediatric Clinics of North America - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Source Type: research
The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are a group of rare, chronic, autoimmune illnesses that affect muscle and, to a lesser extent, skin. The presence of new-onset weakness and, in juvenile dermatomyositis, typical rahes, should lead to consideration of these diagnoses. Careful evaluation to exclude alternative diagnoses is needed. Investigations include a variety of blood tests, imaging, and possibly muscle biopsy. Validated clinical assessments are available for monitoring. Standard treatment includes corticosteroids and methotrexate and often extends beyond 1  year. Outcomes are generally good, bu...
Source: Pediatric Clinics of North America - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Source Type: research
Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a distinctive subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, characterized by fever and arthritis, often accompanied by rash, sometimes by generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and serositis. The diagnosis requires adequate exclusion of infectious, oncologic, autoimmune, and autoinflammatory diseases. Macrophage activation syndrome, a serious and potentially fatal complication of sJIA, requires prompt evaluation and treatment. Newer biologic agents, particularly interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 inhibitors, are highly effective and have transformed the treatment approach...
Source: Pediatric Clinics of North America - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Source Type: research
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