Low back pain sufferers 'often receiving inappropriate care'

More and more people are suffering from lowback pain worldwide - an issue that is being made worse by the widespread prevalence of inappropriate treatment methods. This is the conclusion of a series of new scientific papers published by The Lancet, which have reviewed evidence from high and low-income countries, finding that this is a global problem that can only be solved through better adherence to best practice treatment guidelines. A global problem exacerbated by ineffective care The first of these new reviews revealed that low backpain is now the leading cause of disability on a global basis, with the issue becoming more prevalent over time, particularly in low and middle-income countries. It is most common and burdensome in working populations, with many older people finding that their back pain prevents them from taking part in daily activities. Although most cases of low back pain are short-lasting, recurrences are common, with the costs associated with back pain-related healthcare and work disability shown to be enormous. Part of the reason for this was highlighted by the second review, which revealed significant discrepancies in the types of treatment given to these patients. In many cases, sufferers receive emergency care for their pain and are encouraged to rest and stop work, contrary to medical recommendations; they are also commonly referred for scans or surgery, or prescribedpainkillers such as opioids, which are discouraged for treating low back pain. Profess...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

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“A bear, however hard he tries, grows tubby without exercise.” – A. A. Milne You don’t need to knock yourself out at the gym each day to reap the many health benefits of daily exercise. With simple planning and a determination to engage in a healthier lifestyle, you can add easy stints of exercise to your schedule without breaking too much of a sweat. Best of all, you may realize some of these 10 health benefits of daily exercise. Exercise elevates your mood When you are physically active, it stimulates brain chemicals that make you feel better and lifts your mood. Some experts say that exercise of ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits Health-related LifeHelper Self-Help Source Type: blogs
Prominent researchers, clinicians and commentators seem to suggest that aiming to help people live with their pain is aiming too low. That pain cure or at least reduction is The Thing To Do. It’s certainly got a bit of a ring to it – “I can help get rid of your pain” has a sex appeal that “I can help you live with your pain” doesn’t have. And I can recognise the appeal. Persistent pain can be a scourge for those who live with it; it can eat away at every part of life. Imagine waking up one day to find NO PAIN! Excited much? So why do I keep hammering on about this not very glamorou...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Professional topics Research Resilience/Health Science in practice acceptance function healthcare self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
Knee osteoarthritis is, like so many chronic pain problems, a bit of a weird one. While most of us learned that osteoarthritis is a fairly benign disease, one that we can’t do a whole lot about but one that plagues many of us, the disability associated with a painful knee is pretty high – and we still don’t have much of a clue about how the pain we experience is actually generated.  Cartilage doesn’t have nociceptive fibres, yet deterioration of cartilage is the hallmark of osteoarthritis, though there are other structures capable of producing nociceptive input around the knee joint. Perhaps, a...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice biopsychosocial Chronic pain disability pain management rehabilitation treatment Source Type: blogs
WILLIAMSON, West Virginia — This town on the eastern border of Kentucky has 3,150 residents, one hotel, one gas station, one fire station — and about 50 opiate overdoses each month.On the first weekend of each month, when public benefits like disability get paid out, the local fire chief estimates the city sees about half a million dollars in drug sales. The area is poor — 29 percent of county residents live in poverty, and, amid the retreat of the coal industry, the unemployment rate was 12.2 percent when I visited last August— and those selling pills are not always who you'd expect."Elder...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
I’ve worked in persistent pain management for most of my career. This means I am biased towards pain management. At times this creates tension when I begin talking to clinicians who work in acute or subacute musculoskeletal pain, because they wonder whether what I talk about is relevant to them. After all, why would someone need to know about ongoing management when hopefully their pain will completely go? I have sympathy for this position – for many people, a bout of tendonosis, or a strained muscle or even radicular pain can ebb away, leaving the person feeling as good as new. While it might take a few months...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Back pain Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Resilience/Health biopsychosocial healthcare pain management rehabilitation Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The quality of the evidence examining physical activity and exercise for chronic pain is low. This is largely due to small sample sizes and potentially underpowered studies. A number of studies had adequately long interventions, but planned follow-up was limited to less than one year in all but six reviews.There were some favourable effects in reduction in pain severity and improved physical function, though these were mostly of small-to-moderate effect, and were not consistent across the reviews. There were variable effects for psychological function and quality of life.The available evidence suggests physica...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Low back pain, the scourge of mankind: it is the second leading cause of disability here in the United States, and the fourth worldwide. It’s also one of the top five medical problems for which people see doctors. Almost every day that I see patients, I see someone with back pain. It’s one of the top reasons for lost wages due to missed work, as well as for healthcare dollars spent, hence, a very expensive problem. Looking at two kinds of back pain Let’s talk about the most common forms of back pain: acute (which lasts less than four weeks) and subacute (which lasts four to 12 weeks). Most of these cases ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Managing your health care Pain Management Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The quality of the evidence examining physical activity and exercise for chronic pain is low. This is largely due to small sample sizes and potentially underpowered studies. A number of studies had adequately long interventions, but planned follow-up was limited to less than one year in all but six reviews.There were some favourable effects in reduction in pain severity and improved physical function, though these were mostly of small-to-moderate effect, and were not consistent across the reviews. There were variable effects for psychological function and quality of life.The available evidence suggests physica...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
ObjectiveIn this randomized controlled trial, we compared the effect of celecoxib and acetaminophen on pain and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scores in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. MethodsA total of 50 patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were blindly randomized into 2 groups treated with celecoxib (200 mg twice daily) or acetaminophen (500 mg twice daily). Outcome measures included total back pain, nocturnal back pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, the Short Form 36 health survey to assess physical and mental status, and patient global assessment. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Dis...
Source: Arthritis Care and Research - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Pain Source Type: research
Conclusions: Work disability prevention strategies should consider both employee age and chronic condition diagnosis.
Source: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
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