Illness Uncertainty and Posttraumatic Stress in Young Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

CONCLUSIONS: Young adults with CHD may be at risk for the development of long-term psychological stress and PTSD in the setting of chronic uncertainty. Regular monitoring to identify PTSS/PTSD may be a means to promote treatment adherence and participation in healthcare. PMID: 29601372 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: J Cardiovasc Nurs Source Type: research

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“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
(Reuters Health) - People who suffer from conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, a Swedish study suggests, and the risk may be greatest in the months right after stress disorders are diagnosed.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Clinical Epidemiology and Global HealthAuthor(s): Maryam Ahmadi, Saeid KomasiAbstractBackgroundObviously, determining and organizing patients’ health profile is important after a cardiac event or procedure. Therefore, the present study was conducted with the aim of cluster analysis of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, illness risk factors, and health-promoting lifestyle profile (HPLP) in patients with heart disease.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was conducted on 201 patients with established heart disease in a hospital in the west of Iran. T...
Source: Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Someone with a stress disorder was 37 percent more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those in the general population.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Heart Mental Health and Disorders Anxiety and Stress Source Type: news
Ulrik Stervbo1†, Toralf Roch2†, Timm H. Westhoff1, Ludmyla Gayova3, Andrii Kurchenko3, Felix S. Seibert1‡ and Nina Babel1,2*‡ 1Center for Translational Medicine, Medical Department I, Marien Hospital Herne, University Hospitals of the Ruhr-University of Bochum, Herne, Germany 2Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Berlin, Germany 3Department of Bioorganic and Biological Chemistry, Bogomolets National M...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
A study by the University of Iceland and the Karolinska Institute found people who suffer from disorders like PTSD are considerably more at risk of heart failure within the first of a traumatic event.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Jeffrey L. Birk, Jennifer A. Sumner, Mytra Haerizadeh, Reuben Heyman-Kantor, Louise Falzon, Christopher Gonzalez, Liliya Gershengoren, Peter Shapiro, Donald Edmondson, Ian M. KronishAbstractPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) induced by life-threatening medical events has been associated with adverse physical and mental health outcomes, but it is unclear whether early interventions to prevent the onset of PTSD after these events are efficacious. We conducted a systematic review to address this need. We searched six biomedical e...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
  Answer: No—unless you do it for more than a few months. After a few months, the upfront metabolic and weight benefits will begin to reverse and new health problems arise. We know this with confidence. I raise this question once again because more and more people are coming to me reporting problems. It may take months, even years, but the long-term consequences can be quite serious. Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is—without a doubt—an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, redu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ketones bowel flora ketogenic ketotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Sellers of such " young blood " plasma transfusions have claimed that they can " treat " normal aging, memory loss, dementia, Parkinson ’s disease, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, or post-traumatic stress disorder.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Sellers of such " young blood " plasma transfusions have claimed that they can " treat " normal aging, memory loss, dementia, Parkinson ’s disease, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, or post-traumatic stress disorder.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
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