The role of inflammation in neurological disorders.

The role of inflammation in neurological disorders. Curr Pharm Des. 2018 Mar 27;: Authors: Degan D, Ornello R, Tiseo C, Carolei A, Sacco S, Pistoia F Abstract Traditionally neurological diseases have been classified, on the basis of their pathogenesis, into vascular, degenerative, inflammatory and traumatic diseases. Examples of the main inflammatory neurological diseases include multiple sclerosis, which is characterized by an immune-mediated immune response against myelin proteins, and meningoencephalitis, where the inflammatory response is triggered by infectious agents. However, recent evidence suggests a potential role of inflammatory mechanisms also in neurological conditions not usually categorized as inflammatory, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington' disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and traumatic brain injuries. The activation of glial cells and of complement-mediated pathways, the synthesis of inflammation mediators, and the recruitment of leukocytes are the key elements of secondary inflammatory injury following a wide spectrum of primary brain injuries. A better understanding of the role that inflammatory processes play in the natural history of diseases is essential in order to identify potential therapeutic targets and to develop integrated pharmacological approaches acting at different levels and stages of the diseases. PMID: 29589534 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research

Related Links:

ski A Abstract Neurodegeneration (NDG) is linked with the progressive loss of neural function with intellectual and/or motor impairment. Several diseases affecting older individuals, including Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke, Multiple Sclerosis and many others, are the most relevant disorders associated with NDG. Since other pathologies such as refractory epilepsy, brain infections, or hereditary diseases such as "neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation", also lead to chronic brain inflammation with loss of neural cells, NDG can...
Source: Epilepsy Curr - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Neuropharmacol Source Type: research
Abstract The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents neurotoxic plasma components, blood cells, and pathogens from entering the brain. At the same time, the BBB regulates transport of molecules into and out of the central nervous system (CNS), which maintains tightly controlled chemical composition of the neuronal milieu that is required for proper neuronal functioning. In this review, we first examine molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the BBB. Then, we focus on BBB transport physiology, endothelial and pericyte transporters, and perivascular and paravascular transport. Next, we discuss ...
Source: Physiological Reviews - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Physiol Rev Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29513402 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Immunology Source Type: research
"Understanding the Role of Hypoxia inducible factor during neurodegeneration for new therapeutics opportunities". Curr Neuropharmacol. 2018 Jan 10;: Authors: Merelli A, Rodriguez JCG, Folch J, Regueiro MR, Camins A, Alberto L Abstract Neurodegeneration (NDG) is linked with the progressive loss of neural function with intellectual and/or motor impairment. Several diseases affecting older individuals, including Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke, Multiple Sclerosis and many others, are the most relevant disorders associated wit...
Source: Current Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Neuropharmacol Source Type: research
Authors: Matilla-Dueñas A, Corral-Juan M, Rodríguez-Palmero Seuma A, Vilas D, Ispierto L, Morais S, Sequeiros J, Alonso I, Volpini V, Serrano-Munuera C, Pintos-Morell G, Álvarez R, Sánchez I Abstract More than 600 human disorders afflict the nervous system. Of these, neurodegenerative diseases are usually characterised by onset in late adulthood, progressive clinical course, and neuronal loss with regional specificity in the central nervous system. They include Alzheimer's disease and other less frequent dementias, brain cancer, degenerative nerve diseases, encephalitis, epilepsy, geneti...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Astrocytes are an important class of support cell in the brain, and one of the most common cell types in brain tissue. They carry out a wide range of tasks, most of which are absolutely essential to the functions performed by neurons. A few years ago, researchers suggested that senescent astrocytes may be responsible for a sizable portion of the progression of neurodegenerative conditions, a proposal expanded and further investigated since then, with a great deal more evidence gathered. Astrocyte behavior in the brain appears to change for the worse with age in a number of ways, not all of which may be connected to cellula...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 2016 Source:Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology, Volume 103 Author(s): Pravir Kumar, Dhiraj Kumar, Saurabh Kumar Jha, Niraj Kumar Jha, Rashmi K. Ambasta The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease...
Source: Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 November 2015 Source:Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology Author(s): Pravir Kumar, Dhiraj Kumar, Saurabh Kumar Jha, Niraj Kumar Jha, Rashmi K. Ambasta The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Hun...
Source: Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Abstract Purinergic signalling appears to play important roles in neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Initially there is a brief summary of the background of purinergic signalling, including release of purines and pyrimidines from neural and non-neural cells and their ectoenzymatic degradation, and the current characterisation of P1 (adenosine), and P2X (ion channel) and P2Y (G protein-coupled) nucleotide receptor subtypes. There is also coverage of the localization and roles of purinoceptors in the healthy central nervous system. The focus is then on the roles of purinergic signalling in tra...
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research
The invention pertains to derivatives of docosahexaenoylethanolamide (synaptamide or DEA) and their use in inducing neurogenesis, neurite growth, and/or synaptogenesis. As such, these DEA derivatives can be used as therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases such as traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, autism, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The DEA derivatives of the invention have increased potency and hydrolysis resistance as compared to native DEA. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
More News: ALS | Alzheimer's | Brain | Drugs & Pharmacology | Huntington's Disease | Men | Multiple Sclerosis | Neurology | Parkinson's Disease | Stroke