Review of evidence for dietary influences on atopic dermatitis.

Review of evidence for dietary influences on atopic dermatitis. Skin Therapy Lett. 2014 Aug;19(4):5-7 Authors: Mohajeri S, Newman SA Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting children and adolescents worldwide. The relationship of AD to diet has been a matter of curiosity for many years. Here we look at the evidence in the literature of the association between AD and diet, and the effectiveness of elimination diets and diet supplementation in the management of AD. Several studies have found an association between clinical food allergy and AD, and more recent investigations have also suggested that dietary elements may promote late AD exacerbations. Diet elimination trials in select patients who are clinically allergic to eggs have shown promise in reducing symptoms. Additionally, elimination of food additives in a subgroup of patients was found to be beneficial. Finally, diet supplementations with evening primrose oil and an omega-3 fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid) may be appropriate in certain AD candidates. PMID: 25188523 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Skin Therapy Letter - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Skin Therapy Lett Source Type: research

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Purpose of review The aim of the article is to critically appraise the most relevant studies in the rapidly advancing field of food allergy prevention. Recent findings Epidemiologic studies identified atopic dermatitis as a strong risk factor for food allergy, with mounting evidence for impaired skin barrier and cutaneous inflammation in the pathogenesis. Additional risk factors include a family history of atopy, the timing of allergenic food introduction into the infant's diet, dietary diversity, vitamin D, and environmental factors, such as dog ownership. Early introduction of allergenic foods (such as peanut) into ...
Source: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care - Category: Nutrition Tags: PAEDIATRICS: Edited by Berthold Koletzko and Raanan Shamir Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity RFA-AI-20-007 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite applications from single institutions or consortia of institutions to participate in the Asthma and Allergic Diseases Cooperative Research Centers (AADCRC) program. The program will support centers that integrate clinical and translational research to conduct studies on the mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of diseases of interest, including asthma, rhinitis (allergic and non-allergic), chronic rhinosinusitis, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and drug allergy....
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 3Author(s):
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 3Author(s): Fatima Bawany, Lisa A. Beck, Kirsi M. Järvinen
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin condition in pediatric patients. AD has long been associated with comorbidities including food allergies, asthma, and allergic rhinitis, but recent literature has expanded this list to include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and depression. AD has tremendous impact on quality of life for both affected children and their families. Improved understanding of AD pathogenesis, particularly regarding skin barrier dysfunction, the role of the cutaneous microbiome, and immune dysregulation, has spawned exciting new therapeutic directions. Althou...
Source: Pediatric Annals - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Ann Source Type: research
Purpose of review To present and discuss key design concepts for optimizing the impact of observational studies in the field of allergy and to highlight recent findings from NIAID-funded research networks. Recent findings We discuss three concepts. First, the benefit of prospective, longitudinal observational studies exemplified by recent findings on the seasonal nature of all rhinitis phenotypes in children with asthma and the protective effects of high house dust allergen content during the first year of life on the development of asthma at age 7 years. Second, the benefit of detailed (deep) phenotyping exemplified ...
Source: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: GENETICS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY: Edited by Isabella Annesi-Maesano and Antonella Cianferoni Source Type: research
Conclusion: FHRs to seafish in AD patients are associated with persistent eczematic lesions and with the higher occurrence of sensitization to fungi and reactions to celery. The occurrence of bronchial asthma, rhinitis, positive family history, and onset of AD under 5 years of age is higher in patients with reactions to seafish, but the difference is not statistically significant.
Source: Indian Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
This study aimed to determine serum total IgE level, eosinophil count, and serum level of IFN-γ, in relation to the age of atopic patients and genotyping of the IFN-γ gene at +874 T/A in relation to serum IFN-γ level. As well as comparing of IFN-γ concentrations of atopic patients according to genotypes in atopic patients and apparently healthy control. The studied groups were 25 apparently healthy controls and 75 atopic patients (25 asthma patients, 25 allergic rhinitis patients and 25 atopic dermatitis patients). The obtained results showed that, the prevalence of atopic diseases occurred in the...
Source: Meta Gene - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Håvard Ove Skjerven, Eva Maria Rehbinder, Riyas Vettukattil, Marissa LeBlanc, Berit Granum, Guttorm Haugen, Gunilla Hedlin, Linn Landrø, Benjamin J Marsland, Knut Rudi, Kathrine Dønvold Sjøborg, Cilla Söderhäll, Anne Cathrine Staff, Kai-Håkon Carlsen, Anna Asarnoj, Karen Eline Stensby Bains, Oda C Lødrup Carlsen, Kim M Advocaat Endre, Peder Annæus Granlund, Johanne Uthus HermansenSummaryBackgroundSkin emollients applied during early infancy could prevent atopic dermatitis, and early comple...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
We report a case of an 8-year-old boy who developed a cochineal allergy.Current disease history: He has been suffering from atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, and food allergies since childhood. At the age of seven, he experienced an unknown anaphylaxis reaction twice. When he was 8 years old, he ate a frankfurter containing hypoallergenic cochineal for the first time; cold sweat, intraoral discomfort, respiratory distress, and urticaria appeared throughout the body. His skin prick tests were positive, with a result of 2+to frankfurter and cochineal dyes (color value 0.1 and 0.01). In the immunoblot assay, binding of IgE...
Source: Arerugi - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Arerugi Source Type: research
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