Woman dies after ‘acupuncture’ session that used live bees instead of needles

A woman in Spain died after undergoing a supposedly routine “bee acupuncture” treatment and then suffering an allergic reaction that put her in a coma. The alternative medicine procedure is more or less what its name conjures up: Instead of a needle, an acupuncture practitioner injects bee venom into the body at certain points. In some instances, […]Related:Longtime AIDS researcher Robert Redfield picked to lead CDCTeenage twins needed liver transplants. One of them lived long enough to get his.Former FDA commissioners say right-to-try bills could endanger ‘vulnerable patients’
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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We report the sharp reduction in the incidence of AIDS defining cancers in a multicentric, retrospective study carried out since 1991 and involving six Infectious Diseases Units spread across Italy. However, due to the parallel increase in non-AIDS defining cancers, cancer incidence was not reduced. Focusing on predictors of death in HIV-positive patients with neoplastic disease, multivariate models revealed that males as well as drug abusers were independently associated with a poor clinical outcome. PMID: 30882379 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Infezioni in Medicina - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infez Med Source Type: research
Relationships found to be key to happiness; having friends at work impacts physician happiness
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology Source Type: news
Publication date: 19 March 2019Source: Cell Reports, Volume 26, Issue 12Author(s): Amanda Linkous, Demosthenes Balamatsias, Matija Snuderl, Lincoln Edwards, Ken Miyaguchi, Teresa Milner, Batsheva Reich, Leona Cohen-Gould, Andrew Storaska, Yasumi Nakayama, Emily Schenkein, Richa Singhania, Stefano Cirigliano, Tarig Magdeldin, Ying Lin, Gouri Nanjangud, Kalyani Chadalavada, David Pisapia, Conor Liston, Howard A. FineSummaryThe prognosis of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains dismal, with a median survival of approximately 15 months. Current preclinical GBM models are limited by the lack of a “normal” hu...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
A new study in patients with rifampin-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is providing the first strong evidence that the Bangladesh protocol for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB, which is used for 9 to 11 months, is not inferior to the standard regimen recommended by the World Health Organization, which requires treatment for 20 months.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
Here is my point-by-point response to several of the statements made in thepress release issued by City Attorney Herrera announcing the introduction of legislation to ban the sale of all electronic cigarettes in the city of San Francisco:" City Attorney Dennis Herrera and Supervisor Shamann Walton today announced joint steps to curb the epidemic of youth e-cigarette use, which has erased more than a decade ’s worth of progress in reducing youth tobacco consumption. "The “epidemic” of youth e-cigarette use has not “erased” progress in reducing youth tobacco consumption. The gains in r...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs
Adolescents and young adults, particularly young women in low- and middle-income countries, face numerous and well-documented threats to their sexual and reproductive health, including adolescent pregnancy and childbearing, much of it unintended; complications from unsafe abortions; HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; and child marriage [1 –3]. To address these challenges, governments and nongovernmental organizations have attempted a range of intervention strategies, such as comprehensive sexuality education in schools [4], youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services [5], and cash transfers [6,7].
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
[Vanguard] Katsina -No fewer than 246 head teachers, drawn from the various states in Nigeria, have been sensitized to have more knowledge on inculcating to students, morals, dangers, prevention and eradication of HIV/AIDs in the country as well as other associated cultural issues.
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Authors: Letshwenyo-Maruatona SB, Madisa M, Boitshwarelo T, George-Kefilwe B, Kingori C, Ice G, Bianco JA, Marape M, Haile ZT Abstract In Botswana, an estimated 350 000 people live with HIV/AIDS. HIV/AIDS testing rates are low, suggesting that many other people remain undiagnosed. Stigma related to HIV/AIDS is prevalent and contributes to low testing rates and under-diagnosis of the virus. Identifying factors that contribute to stigma, such as insufficient or inaccurate knowledge of HIV/AIDS, may be critical in increasing early identification and treatment. This cross-sectional study used nationally representative ...
Source: African Journal of AIDS Research - Category: African Health Tags: Afr J AIDS Res Source Type: research
This study reported for the first time the factors influencing adherence to ART in a rural area of East Gabon. We recommend further investigations in a large cohort to better assess the impact of socio-clinical factors on ART adherence in a vulnerable group of patients. PMID: 30880584 [PubMed - in process]
Source: African Journal of AIDS Research - Category: African Health Tags: Afr J AIDS Res Source Type: research
Authors: Mkandawire P, Arku G, Luginaah I, Etowa J Abstract The role played by the transport sector in the regional spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa is well known, yet attention has remained confined to entertainment hotspots and stopping places along long-distance highways and cross-border transport corridors. This paper draws attention to informal modes of transit prevalent in sub-Saharan African cities, by linking the rise of two-wheeled, manually operated bicycles, known as "Sacramento", to the potential spread of HIV and AIDS in Malawi. The findings of a qualitative study from Mzuzu city show that...
Source: African Journal of AIDS Research - Category: African Health Tags: Afr J AIDS Res Source Type: research
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