Dual Factors May Be Necessary for Development of Atopic March in Early Infancy.

Dual Factors May Be Necessary for Development of Atopic March in Early Infancy. J Nippon Med Sch. 2018;85(1):2-10 Authors: Taniuchi S, Soejima K, Hatano Y, Takahashi M, Minami H Abstract The incidence of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergies, allergic rhinitis, and asthma, has increased in recent decades, and currently affects approximately 20% of the population. Atopic march is the development of AD in infancy and subsequent food allergies, allergic rhinitis, and asthma in later childhood. Patients with infantile eczema may develop typical symptoms of AD, allergic rhinitis, and asthma at certain ages. Some patients' symptoms persist for several years, whereas others may have resolution with aging. Development of these diseases is strongly influenced by the following two factors: skin dysfunction caused by filaggrin mutations and development of colonization of microflora in early infancy. Filaggrin mutations predisposing to asthma, allergic rhinitis, and allergic sensitization, only in the presence of AD, strongly support the role of filaggrin in the pathogenesis of AD and in subsequent progression of the atopic march. Several studies have shown that development of colonization of microflora in early infancy might affect development of allergic disease or food desensitization. Therefore, massive allergen exposure to genetic skin dysfunction in early infancy and an imbalance of microflora might be necessary for development of a...
Source: Journal of Nippon Medical School - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: J Nippon Med Sch Source Type: research

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Allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergy (FA), asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) are common; according to a national birth cohort study in Japan, almost half of pregnant women reported a history of allergic disease.1 Given that genetic factors, including family history, are predictors of allergic diseases in offspring, we expect the birth of many infants who carry a high risk of developing allergies. Among allergy prevention strategies, the effectiveness of primary prevention of eczema in high-risk infants by the topical application of emollient during the neonatal period has been demonstrated in two ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Allergic diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis, are common; according to a national birth cohort study in Japan, almost half of pregnant women reported a history of allergic disease.1 Given that genetic factors, including family history, are predictors of allergic diseases in offspring, we expect the birth of many infants with a high risk of developing allergies. Among allergy prevention strategies, the effectiveness of primary prevention of eczema in high-risk infants by the topical application of emollient during the neonatal period has been demonstrated in 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence to support short-term or prolonged feeding with a hydrolysed formula compared with exclusive breast feeding for prevention of allergic disease. Very low-quality evidence indicates that short-term use of an EHF compared with a CMF may prevent infant CMA. Further trials are recommended before implementation of this practice.We found no evidence to support prolonged feeding with a hydrolysed formula compared with a CMF for prevention of allergic disease in infants unable to be exclusively breast fed. PMID: 30338526 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
ConclusionsSelf-reported adult-onset AD is common and has distinct phenotypes with lesional predilection for the hands and/or head/neck.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions Self-reported adult-onset AD is common and has distinct phenotypes with lesional predilection for the hands and/or head/neck.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Dietary restrictions are common among Chinese children with eczema in Hong Kong, who have a lower calcium, vitamin D, and iron intake. Nonetheless, such practice is not associated with changes to bone mineral density or bone resorptive biomarker. PMID: 28775219 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Hong Kong Med J Source Type: research
Abstract We welcome the critique by Apfelbacher and colleagues 1 of our overview of patient‐reported outcome measures (PROMS) in allergy and asthma clinical studies in children 2. Our focus was on identifying valid instruments and in so doing we relied on our own detailed systematic reviews in relation to asthma and food allergy 3‐5, recent evidence‐based guidelines on PROMS in allergy 6, and systematic reviews undertaken by others in atopic eczema/dermatitis and allergic rhinitis 7. We agree that on a closer look at the primary evidence in relation to PROMs for atopic eczema/dermatitis, whilst there is some evidence...
Source: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn the outpatient setting, the ICD‐9‐CM codes 691.8 and 692.9 alone have poor PPV. Incorporation of diagnoses of asthma, hay fever and food allergy improves PPV and specificity. In the inpatient setting, a primary discharge diagnosis of 691.8 had excellent PPV. Although ICD‐10 has been adopted in Europe and more recently the US, the same systematic errors would likely occur unless providers standardize their coding.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Original Article: Epidemiology and Genetics Source Type: research
DISCUSSION SESSION 1: Food allergy (PD01 –PD05)PD01 Allergen-specific humoral and cellular responses in children who fail egg oral immunotherapy due to allergic reactionsMarta Vazquez-Ortiz, Mariona Pascal, Ana Maria Plaza, Manel JuanPD02 FoxP3 epigenetic features in children with cow milk allergyLorella Paparo, Rita Nocerino, Rosita Aitoro, Ilaria Langella, Antonio Amoroso, Alessia Amoroso, Carmen Di Scala, Roberto Berni CananiPD04 Combined milk and egg allergy in early childhood: let them eat cake?Santanu Maity, Giuseppina Rotiroti, Minal GandhiPD05 Introduction of complementary foods in relation to allergy and gut...
Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of the International Eczema Council found a strong pattern of immune activation in peripheral blood and the propensity to both skin and systemic infections. Associations with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, and malignant diseases were increasingly reported, but confirmation of their link with atopic dermatitis requires longitudinal studies.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
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