Scientists Discover New Drugs To Treat Hot Flashes

BOSTON (CBS) — Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new class of experimental drugs to treat menopausal hot flashes. In a clinical trial involving 37 women, the compound called MLE4901 reduced the number of hot flashes by almost three-quarters and significantly reduced the severity. The drug blocks a chemical in the brain called neurokinin B and in the study the drug also improved sleep and concentration during the 4-week study period. MLE4901 can affect liver function but two similar drugs which don’t have this side effect are being studied in larger patient trials including one in the U.S. that was launched last year. There aren’t a lot of effective treatments for hot flashes, other than hormone replacement therapy, which can increase the risk of breast cancer and blood clots, so new drugs are sorely needed. menopause
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Menopause Women's Health Source Type: news

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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Family Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Babies Dr. Mallika Marshall Health Watch Health watch with Mallika Marshall Sleeping Source Type: news
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration says another heart medicine is being voluntarily recalled after tests showed that it was tainted with a potential cancer-causing chemical. The recall includes one lot of Sandoz’s losartan potassium hydrochlorothiazide 100 milligram/25 milligram tablets with the lot number JB8912. Patients use these drugs to keep their high blood pressure in check. The drug is being recalled because the active ingredient has tested positive for N-Nitrosodiethylamine or NDEA, a suspected human and animal carcinogen that is used in gasoline as a stabilizer for industry materials and as a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Consumer Health News Local TV Valsartan Source Type: news
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Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSION Cognitive impairment can affect daily functioning, quality of life, and capacity to work in patients with cancer and those in remission. Consequently, cognitive assessment is now an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Cancer-related cognitive impairment might be due to the direct effects of the cancer itself, nonspecific factors, or comorbid conditions that are independent of the disease and/or due to the adverse effects of the treatment or combination of treatments given for the disease. The prevalence and extent of cognitive impairment associated with cancer is recognized but...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognition Current Issue Neuro oncology Neurology Review cancer chemotherapy cognitive impairment neuropsychological assessment treatment Source Type: research
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Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: EPMA Journal - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
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