Hormone Replacement Therapy May Boost Women's Hearts Hormone Replacement Therapy May Boost Women's Hearts

Taking hormone replacement therapy during menopause may improve the structure and function of women's hearts, potentially lowering their risk of heart disease, say UK investigators.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - Category: Cardiology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: Molecular MetabolismAuthor(s): Andrea L. Hevener, Zhenqi Zhou, Timothy M. Moore, Brian G. Drew, Vicent RibasAbstractBackgroundThe incidence of chronic disease is elevated in women after menopause. Natural variation in muscle expression of the estrogen receptor (ER)α is inversely associated with plasma insulin and adiposity. Moreover, reduced muscle ERα expression levels are observed in women and animals presenting clinical features of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Considering that metabolic dysfunction impacts nearly a quarter of the U.S. adult populatio...
Source: Molecular Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume 28, Issue 7Author(s): T. Sathyapalan, M. Aye, A.S. Rigby, N.J. Thatcher, S.R. Dargham, E.S. Kilpatrick, S.L. AtkinAbstractBackgroundHormone replacement therapy may be beneficial for cardiovascular disease risk (CVR) in post-menopausal women. Soy isoflavones may act as selective estrogen receptor modulators. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether soy isoflavones had an effect on CVR markers.MethodsThe expected 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality were calculated as a secondary endpoint from a double blind rand...
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: Molecular MetabolismAuthor(s): Andrea L. Hevener, Zhenqi Zhou, Tim M. Moore, Brian G. Drew, Vicent RibasAbstractBackgroundThe incidence of chronic disease is elevated in women after menopause. Natural variation in muscle expression of the estrogen receptor (ER)α is inversely associated with plasma insulin and adiposity. Moreover, reduced muscle ERα expression levels are observed in women and animals presenting clinical features of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Considering that metabolic dysfunction elevates chronic disease risk, including type 2 diabetes...
Source: Molecular Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume 28, Issue 7Author(s): T. Sathyapalan, M. Aye, A.S. Rigby, N.J. Thatcher, S.R. Dargham, E.S. Kilpatrick, S.L. AtkinAbstractBackgroundHormone replacement therapy may be beneficial for cardiovascular disease risk (CVR) in post-menopausal women. Soy isoflavones may act as selective estrogen receptor modulators. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether soy isoflavones had an effect on CVR markers.MethodsThe expected 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality were calculated as a secondary endpoint from a double blind rand...
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: Molecular MetabolismAuthor(s): Andrea L. Hevener, Zhenqi Zhou, Tim M. Moore, Brian G. Drew, Vicent RibasAbstractBackgroundThe incidence of chronic disease is elevated in women after menopause. Natural variation in muscle expression of the estrogen receptor (ER)α is inversely associated with plasma insulin and adiposity. Moreover, reduced muscle ERα expression levels are observed in women and animals presenting clinical features of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Considering that metabolic dysfunction elevates chronic disease risk, including type 2 diabetes...
Source: Molecular Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018 Source:Molecular Metabolism Author(s): Andrea L. Hevener, Zhenqi Zhou, Tim M. Moore, Brian G. Drew, Vicent Ribas Background The incidence of chronic disease is elevated in women after menopause. Natural variation in muscle expression of the estrogen receptor (ER)α is inversely associated with plasma insulin and adiposity. Moreover, reduced muscle ERα expression levels are observed in women and animals presenting clinical features of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Considering that metabolic dysfunction elevates chronic disease risk, including type 2 diabetes, he...
Source: Molecular Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusions Supplementation with soy protein with isoflavones for 6 months significantly improved CVR markers and calculated CVR at 6 months during early menopause compared to soy protein without isoflavones. ISRCTN registry ISRCTN34051237.
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Conclusion: In post-menopausal women, lower HRV was associated with a modestly higher, but statistically significant, risk for incident cardiovascular events, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. Factors associated with lower HRV and cardiac autonomic impairment may be candidates for reducing CHD risk, such as better glycemic control and improved physical activity.
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Session Title: Predicting the Future Source Type: research
ConclusionsConsumption of soda was associated with adverse levels in a biomarker of inflammation and cardiovascular risk, serum CRP, in Mexican women. These results add to the accumulating evidence on soda and cardiovascular risk. More research is necessary to understand the potential impact of artificially sweetened sodas.
Source: Journal of Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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