Postnatal anxiety prevalence, predictors and effects on development: A narrative review

Publication date: May 2018 Source:Infant Behavior and Development, Volume 51 Author(s): Tiffany Field The increasing prevalence of postnatal anxiety highlights the need for summarizing the recent research on this condition to inform screening and intervention efforts. This narrative review of the literature was derived from a search on PubMed and PsycINFO for papers published since 2010. The demographic risk factors for postnatal anxiety include being a young mother, having more education and being employed. Childbirth risk factors include being primiparous in one sample and multiparous in another, caesarean delivery, fear of the birth and of death during delivery, lack of control during labor, low self-confidence for the delivery and the delivery staff, and premature delivery. Social support problems include the lack of family support, marital/family conflict, and social health issues. Psychiatric history risk factors include prenatal depression and anxiety. Postnatal anxiety has negative effects on breast-feeding, bonding, mother–infant interactions, infant temperament, sleep, mental development, health and internalizing behavior and on conduct disorder in adolescents. Unfortunately, only six postnatal anxiety intervention studies could be found including paternal education, music therapy during labor, mothers massaging their infants, cognitive behavior therapy and administering oxytocin. The negative effects of postnatal anxiety and the limitations of the research i...
Source: Infant Behavior and Development - Category: Child Development Source Type: research

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It’s supposed to be the most exciting time of your life … and everyone is telling you how lucky you are to have a beautiful baby, but all you can do is cry. You’re pretty sure none of your new-mom friends are feeling this way. But they might be. Because 15 to 20 percent of new moms, about 1 million women in the US each year, experience some form of postpartum depression. Truth be told, my baby days were the most difficult and painful hours of my life. I was a hormonal and stress train wreck. Looking back now–my youngest is five–I see that a few alterations in my lifestyle might have helped m...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Personal Psychotherapy Relationships Self-Esteem Sleep Stress Treatment Women's Issues Baby Blues Baby Days Beautiful Baby Brooke S Source Type: blogs
You recently had a baby, and everyone keeps saying that you must be in sheer and utter bliss. Clearly, you’re captivated by your bundle of joy. You must be enamored and in absolute love. I bet you’re just walking on cloud nine. You finally have what you’ve always wanted. Life is complete now, isn’t it? you hear. And all you want to do is cry (or scream) in their face. Because that’s not how you feel. And those aren’t the thoughts running through your mind. Instead, you keep thinking that you’ve made a mistake. A horrible mistake. I never should’ve had this baby. Or you think...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Women's Issues Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Patterns of maternal symptoms and functioning were associated with pain frequency and emotional symptoms in children. Further examination of individual differences in mothers with chronic pain that may confer risk for chronic pain and psychological disorders in children is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
Source: Health Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Albert Sanfeliu1, Karsten Hokamp2, Michael Gill1 and Daniela Tropea1,3*1Neuropsychiatric Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, St James Hospital, Dublin, Ireland2Department of Genetics, School of Genetics and Microbiology, Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland3Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity College Institute for Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, IrelandRett syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder with a wide symptomatology including impaired communication and movement, cardio-respiratory abno...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion: Fun seeking on the BAS and frustration intolerance should be considered as targets in prevention and intervention programs for IA among adolescents with ADHD.IntroductionThe negative effects of internet addiction (IA) have become a concern in the past decades. IA is characterized by persistent internet use despite negative consequences, loss of control, preoccupation with internet use, increasing amounts of time spent online, and withdrawal symptoms (1). Internet gaming disorders are listed in the “Conditions for Further Study” section in the Fifth Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Men...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Currently available pharmacotherapies for PTSD are poorly effective on a substantial proportion of patients. Given this high rate of pharmacological unresponsiveness, further studies are needed to extend the knowledge of the basic mechanisms associated with the pathophysiology of this disorder. The findings discussed in this review suggest that DAergic dysfunction, especially genetic-dependent DAergic alteration, plays a prominent role in the pathophysiology of PTSD; as a consequence, drugs targeting the DAergic system might be therapeutically relevant. A better understanding of how and which DAergic dysfunctio...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Sleep patterns in children and adolescents were related to the psychiatric diagnosis of their parent(s). Future follow-up of these results may clarify the relations between early sleep differences and the risk of developing mood disorders in individuals at high familial risk.IntroductionSleep disturbances are core symptoms of mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (1). Additionally, sleep problems have been associated with more severe symptoms, greater functional impairment, and increased risk for relapse among individuals with mood disorders (2). Over 40% of children and youth...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Family Friends General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Child Development Fatherhood Postpartum Source Type: blogs
Bipolar disorder affects men and women in equal numbers, and the symptoms are essentially identical. But some key differences do exist—differences that might be due to biological factors, and social ones, too. For starters, research has consistently shown that women have higher rates of bipolar II disorder, “which typically presents as a chronic depressive disorder with periods of hypomania,” according to Candida Fink, MD, a board-certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist with a private practice in Westchester, N.Y. There’s a misconception that bipolar II disorder is less severe than bipola...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Bipolar Disorders Gender General Men's Issues Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder and pregnancy bipolar I Bipolar Ii Gender Differences men and bipolar disorder menopause and bipolar disorder menstruation and bipolar Source Type: news
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