Oseltamivir Not Associated With Increased Suicide Risk in Kids Oseltamivir Not Associated With Increased Suicide Risk in Kids

Oseltamivir, a drug used to treat influenza, was not linked to an increased risk for suicide in children in a large case-crossover study.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

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By Susan Scutti, CNN (CNN) — Life expectancy in the United States declined from 2016 to 2017, yet the 10 leading causes of death remained the same, according to three government reports released Thursday. Increasing deaths due to drug overdoses and suicides explain this slight downtick in life expectancy, the US Centers for Disease Control says. Overdose deaths reached a new high in 2017, topping 70,000, while the suicide rate increased by 3.7%, the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics reports. Dr. Robert Redfield, CDC director, called the trend tragic and troubling. “Life expectancy give...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Source Type: news
U.S. life expectancy dropped in 2017 for the third consecutive year, as deaths by suicide and drug overdose continue to claim more American lives. The average American could expect to live to 78.6 years old in 2017, down from 78.7 in 2016, according to data released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). That decline may be modest, but it marks the third year in a row that life expectancy at birth has fallen — a noteworthy phenomenon, since the previous multiyear drop recorded by the NCHS was in the early 1960s. The modern trend seems to be pr...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
Suicide is one of the most devastating and perplexing of all human behaviors. Whereas the mortality rate for many leading causes of death (eg, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and influenza) has declined over the past century, the suicide rate is virtually iden...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news
Suicide is one of the most devastating and perplexing of all human behaviors. Whereas the mortality rate for many leading causes of death (eg, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and influenza) has declined over the past century, the suicide rate is virtually identical to what it was 100 years ago. Our lack of progress in suicide prevention is in large part owing to our limited understanding of this problem. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) rarely occur in a research laboratory where they can be carefully probed, and we have not had the technology to study them in situ. As a result, we lack a firm understanding of the fundament...
Source: JAMA Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Suicide is the second leading cause of death for individuals ages 10 to 24 years. More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, pneumonia, influenza, and chronic lung disease, combined. Each day in our nation, there is an average of more than 3470 suicide attempts by young adults attending high school. The main objectives of our literature review are to highlight the importance of recognizing postdischarge period in patients at risk of suicide, critically analyzing the risk and protective factors to formulate an individualized safety plan during transition, a...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study found that professional chess players had shorter lifespans than those players who had careers outside of chess and argued that this might be due to the mental strain of international chess competition. In the present study, we focused on survival of International Chess Grandmasters (GMs) which represent players, of whom most are professional, at the highest level. In 2010, the overall life expectancy of GMs at the age of 30 years was 53.6 years, which is significantly greater than the overall weighted mean life expectancy of 45.9 years for the general population. In all three regions examined, mean life...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(American Academy of Family Physicians) A new study finds that use of oseltamivir, an antiviral drug used to treat influenza A and B, does not increase risk of suicide in children.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that oseltamivir does not increase risk of suicide in the pediatric population. PMID: 29531106 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Family Medicine - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Ann Fam Med Source Type: research
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