Body language: UCLA's surgical residents sharpen their skills in special lab

Under the glare of operating-room lights, six UCLA neurosurgery residents embarked on a rare adventure into the human body. As they started cutting into three bodies, Dr. Warwick Peacock, professor of surgery, encouraged them onward. “That should be the linea alba,” he said in his gentle South African accent. “There are some adhesions. Always stick your finger in to make sure you’re not cutting into the bowel. It spoils the day.” Incisions made, the residents approached the spine from the front, sawing through the sternum, moving beyond the lungs and following the rib head to the pedicle, then removing a thoracic disc on each body — in two hours. Completing a discectomy in two hours on a living patient would be extraordinary. But this was no OR. The bodies are cadavers, and the bitter and antiseptic scent of embalming fluid, not blood, fills the air. In UCLA’s Surgical Science Laboratory — one of the few of its kind dedicated to the training of surgical residents — the fledgling surgeons can practice and make mistakes. They bubble with excitement, viewing anatomy rarely seen in this era of minimally invasive surgery and computer modeling: lungs, the front of the spine, the aorta. For Dr. Peacock, an emeritus pediatric neurosurgeon — who developed new techniques for treating children with cerebral palsy by first trying these techniques out on cadavers — teaching residents and exploring the human body on a daily ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research
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Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
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Source: Revue de Medecine Interne - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Rev Med Interne Source Type: research
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Source: Nefrologia : publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Nefrologia Source Type: research
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Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Autism Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Case Review Current Issue Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Pervasive Developmental Disorders brain related disorder hESC human embryonic stem cell neurodevelopmental disorder stem cell therapy Source Type: research
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