Medical News Today: Can you use baking soda to treat acne?

Baking soda is a popular method that many people use to help treat acne breakouts. But is it safe to use, or can it cause more harm than good?
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Complementary Medicine / Alternative Medicine Source Type: news

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Authors: Kallis PJ, Price A, Dosal JR, Nichols AJ, Keri J Abstract Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are increasing in popularity in the field of dermatology. Natural products and holistic approaches are in high demand among patients and research has begun to support their roles in acne and rosacea pathophysiology. In this article, commonly utilized biologically based complementary and alternative therapies for acne and rosacea are reviewed from an evidence-based perspective. Therapies discussed include vitamin C, nicotinamide, zinc, tea tree oil, green tea, resveratrol, curcumin, feverfew, lic...
Source: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Drugs Dermatol Source Type: research
Manuka honey can be used for a variety of skin ailments and may even help treat acne. Learn how its wound-healing and antibacterial properties may help reduce the incidence of acne and inflammation. We also look at how to use Manuka honey as a spot treatment, face mask, and natural cleanser.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Complementary Medicine / Alternative Medicine Source Type: news
Conclusions: While caution should be exercised due to quality of the included studies, acupuncture and auricular acupressure were not statistically different to guideline recommended treatments but were with fewer side effects and may be a treatment option. Future trials should address the methodological weaknesses and meet standard reporting requirements stipulated in STRICTA. PMID: 29721027 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Complementary and alternative medicine approaches are popular among some patient segments due to the perception that they are “natural” and thus are believed to be less likely to be dangerous, to be less toxic, or to cause fewer side effects. In dermatology, these can include aromatherapy, botanicals, and essential oils (plant extracts). Preliminary evidence, biological activity studies, and small pilot clinical trials conducted outside of North America, mostly in young adults, suggest that some may have value in acne treatment.
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Summary BackgroundThe use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing in Western countries, including in the area of dermatology. However, Western healthcare providers have not integrated CAM into regular practice owing to a lack of reliable data supporting its use. To encourage high‐quality research related to the use of CAM and specifically herbal interventions, the CONsolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) extension criteria on reporting herbal interventions (hCONSORT) were published in 2006. ObjectivesTo evaluate the adherence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating herbal in...
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Systematic Review Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicates lack of adherence to hCONSORT extension criteria. Adherence to hCONSORT guidelines should be encouraged in order to provide high quality reporting of research on herbal interventions in dermatology. Doing so may ease the integration of CAM into conventional medical practice and provide actionable data to providers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29271054 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Br J Dermatol Source Type: research
This study aimed to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of Plai among all identified indications. Of the 808 articles identified by a systematic review, six studies were included. Four studies were randomized controlled trials, while two studies were quasi-experimental studies involving 178 patients in intervention group and 177 patients in control group. Duration of treatment ranged from 7days to 2 months. Our findings showed that 14% Plai cream had a strong trend of benefits in pain reduction for muscle pain and ankle sprain. However, evidence supporting the effects of Plai on acne vulgaris treatment and anti-hist...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur data indicates lack of adherence to hCONSORT extension criteria. Adherence to hCONSORT guidelines should be encouraged in order to provide high quality reporting of research on herbal interventions in dermatology. Doing so may ease the integration of CAM into conventional medical practice and provide actionable data to providers.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
We enjoy outdoor activities. My family will be coming over this year and I will fire up the grill for a delicious BBQ grass-fed beef. We’ll play games like badminton and horseshoes. Now while these games can be fun, they can lead to cuts and bruises. I want to aim you with an unconventional solution for those wounds.  For years now, sugar’s been a dirty word. It’s been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease and diabetes to tooth decay and acne. But there’s something they don’t know.  Sugar’s better for you than all those artificial sweeteners and substitutes out th...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Conclusions CAM users were mainly middle-aged females: their high levels of education did not lower the CAM adoption rates. Their choices could have been driven by cultural beliefs and boundaries embedded in the community.
Source: Journal of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
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