Esperion's cholesterol drug succeeds in late-stage study

(Reuters) - Esperion Therapeutics Inc said on Wednesday a late-stage trial of its experimental oral drug met the main goal of reducing cholesterol by 28 percent in patients suffering from, or at a high risk of, an artery-clogging heart disease.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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Tiffany Grant, PhD, Assistant Director for Research and Informatics at the University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library, applied and received a GMR award for a community partnership to improve health literacy and address health disparities. Project Background: Racial and ethnic minorities, those in rural and/or urban areas, and those living in medically underserved areas are at high risk for health-related disparities. Low-income wages, reduced government services, and low educational attainment are a few reasons why these population groups have significant barriers overcoming food insecurity, obesity, mental health is...
Source: The Cornflower - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Blog Consumer Health Funding News from the Region Outreach Success Stories awards Source Type: news
Researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington DC, found that ditching meat improves type 2 diabetics' insulin and cholesterol levels, preventing heart attacks.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Published attendance, uptake, and prescribing rates are all lower than originally anticipated, and data on impact are limited, with very few studies reporting the effect of attendance on health-related behaviours. High-quality studies comparing matched attendees and non-attendees and health economic analyses are required. PMID: 29914882 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of General Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Br J Gen Pract Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The authors generally concur with Dr. Vos and Dr. Biron [1] that long-term low cholesterol levels caused by long-term statin use might be a concern, when overall mortality or survival, is an end-point, since many prospective cohort studies have shown that a low cholesterol levels was associated with higher mortality [2 –4], and the effects of the long-term cholesterol lowering treatment have not been sufficiently investigated [5]. Clinical trials, mainly performed in men with a high risk of heart disease, have showed that statin therapy reduces all-cause mortality, almost entirely by reducing heart disease morta lity...
Source: Atherosclerosis - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Abstract Background: The prevalence, presentation, management, and prognosis of coronary heart disease differ according to sex. Greater understanding on the differences between men and women with acute aortic dissection (AAD) is needed. We aimed to investigate whether sex disparities are found in patients with AAD, and to study sex differences in complications, mortality in-hospital, and long-term. Methods: We included 884 patients enrolled in our institute between June 2002 and May 2016. Considering psychosocial factors, treatments, and the outcomes in men versus those in women with AAD, we explored the asso...
Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research
This study sought to analyze the sex differences in 30-day, 1-year, and long-term net adverse clinical events (NACEs) in Chinese adult patients with STEMI after PCI. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed 1920 consecutive STEMI patients (age ≤60 years) treated with PCI from January 01, 2006, to December 31, 2012. A propensity score analysis between males and females was performed to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics and comorbidities. The primary endpoint was the incidence of 3-year NACE. Survival curves were constructed with Kaplan-Meier estimates and compared by log-rank tests between the t...
Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research
HIGH cholesterol can increase your chance of developing a serious health condition such as heart disease, heart attack and stroke. But how do you know if you ’re at risk? Dr Chris Steele took to This Morning to warn of particular sign to look out for involving the eyelids.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Background: The value of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program has been questioned as a marker of physician quality. Objective: To assess whether physician MOC status is associated with performance on selected Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) process measures. Design: Annual comparisons of HEDIS process measures among physicians who did or did not maintain certification 20 years after initial certification. Setting: Fee-for-service Medicare. Participants: 1260 general internists who were initially certified ...
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
By now, most people are familiar with the factors that can increase the risk of having a heart attack: gaining too much weight, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels, smoking and not exercising enough. In a study published Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers say they have documented another risk factor that could help identify men at greatest risk of heart problems: Among a group of 1,900 men aged 60 to 78, those with erectile dysfunction were twice as likely as men without the condition to have a heart attack, stroke, or die of a heart problem. Around 20% of men over age 20 experience erectile ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Erectile Dysfunction healthytime heart onetime Source Type: news
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