Brain Beta-Catenin Signalling During Stress and Depression.

Brain Beta-Catenin Signalling During Stress and Depression. Neurosignals. 2018 Feb 22;26(1):31-42 Authors: Teo CH, Soga T, Parhar IS Abstract Beta-catenin is a protein with dual functions in the cell, playing a role in both adhesion between cells as well as gene transcription via the canonical Wnt signalling pathway. In the canonical Wnt signalling pathway, beta-catenin again plays multiple roles. In the embryonic stage, the regulation of beta-catenin levels activates genes that govern cell proliferation and differentiation. In an adult organism, beta-catenin continues to regulate the cell cycle - as a result over-expression of beta-catenin may lead to cancer. In the brain, dysfunctions in Wnt signalling related to beta-catenin levels may also cause various pathological conditions like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and depression. Beta-catenin can be influenced by stressful conditions and increases in glucocorticoid levels. In addition, beta-catenin can be regulated by neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine. Fluctuations in beta-catenin in brain regions under duress have been associated with depressive-like behaviours. It is theorized that the change in behaviour can be attributed to the regulation of Dicer by beta-catenin. Dicer, a protein that produces micro-RNAs in the cell, is a target gene for beta-catenin. Amongst the micro-RNA that it produces are those involved in stress resilience. In this way, beta-catenin has taken its pl...
Source: Neuro-Signals - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neurosignals Source Type: research

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Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Our world has never witnessed a time of greater promise for improving human health. Many of today’s health advances have stemmed from a long arc of discovery that begins with strong, steady support for basic science. In large part because of fundamental research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which traces its roots to 1887, Americans are living longer, healthier lives. Life expectancy for a baby born in the U.S. has risen from 47 years in 1900 to more than 78 years today. Among the advances that have helped to make this possible are a 70% decline in the U.S. death rate from cardiovascular disease ...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare medicine Source Type: news
In conclusion, we show here that sEVs are responsible for mediating paracrine senescence and speculate that they could be involved in inducing bystander senescence during therapy-induced senescence or aging. In fact, when compared to soluble factors, sEVs have different biophysical and biochemical properties as they have a longer lifespan than do soluble factors and they are more resistant to protease degradation. The idea that blocking sEV secretion could be a potential therapeutic approach to alleviate senescence "spreading" during chemotherapy-induced senescence or in aging tissues presents itself as a very at...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractCurcumin is widely consumed in Asia either as turmeric directly or as one of the culinary ingredients in food recipes. The benefits of curcumin in different organ systems have been reported extensively in several neurological diseases and cancer. Curcumin has got its global recognition because of its strong antioxidant, anti ‐inflammatory, anti‐cancer, and antimicrobial activities. Additionally, it is used in diabetes and arthritis as well as in hepatic, renal, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, there is growing attention on usage of curcumin to prevent or delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. This...
Source: BioFactors - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abstract Andrographolide is compound extracted from Andrographis paniculata (A. paniculata), a traditional herb that has been used in ancient China and other parts of eastern Asia to treat an array of disorders, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diarrhea, upper respiratory tract infection, and laryngitis, for a very long history. The mechanisms of action of andrographolide in disease prevention and/or therapy include anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, anti-apoptosis, and/or pro-apoptosis. Pharmacodynamic studies have shown that andrographolide can cross the blood brain barrier and distribute into differ...
Source: Biomedicine and pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine and pharmacotherapie - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Biomed Pharmacother Source Type: research
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
481Introduction: The sigma-1 receptor is recognized as a unique class of non-G protein coupled, non-ionotropic intracellular chaperone protein within the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes [1]. It consists of 223 amino acids with a molecular weight of 25.3 kDa. The X-ray structure of sigma-1 receptor showed a membrane-bound trimeric assembly with one transmembrane region [2]. The sigma-1 receptor plays a major role in various pathological conditions in the periphery (e.g. vascular diseases, cancer) and in the central nervous system (CNS), where they are implicated in several neuropsychiatric and n...
Source: Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Authors: Tags: Preclinical Probes for Neuroimaging Source Type: research
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