URMC Investigating New Parkinson's Drug

The University of Rochester Medical Center Clinical Trials Coordination Center (CTCC) has been tapped to help lead a clinical trial for a potential new treatment for Parkinson ’s disease. The study will evaluate nilotinib, a drug currently used to treat leukemia that has shown promise in early studies in people with Parkinson’s disease.
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news

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In this study, we intravenously administrated the young mitochondria into aged mice to evaluate whether energy production increase in aged tissues or age-related behaviors improved after the mitochondrial transplantation. The results showed that heterozygous mitochondrial DNA of both aged and young mouse coexisted in tissues of aged mice after mitochondrial administration, and meanwhile, ATP content in tissues increased while reactive oxygen species (ROS) level reduced. Besides, the mitotherapy significantly improved cognitive and motor performance of aged mice. Our study, at the first report in aged animals, not only prov...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
The authors say low doses of nilotinib were'reasonably safe'in this phase 2 trial, an assessment questioned by authors of an accompanying editorial.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
MONDAY, Dec. 16, 2019 -- A drug used to fight chronic myeloid leukemia might also relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a new study finds. In a phase 2 clinical trial, researchers found that the drug nilotinib (brand name: Tasigna) increased...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
MONDAY, Dec. 16, 2019 -- A drug used to fight chronic myeloid leukemia might also relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a new study finds. In a phase 2 clinical trial, researchers found that the drug nilotinib (brand name: Tasigna) increased...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Nilotinib hydrochloride, an Abelson tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, has been in the neurology news since the results of the open-label, phase 1 study in a small group of patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies was reported at the Society for Neuroscience in Chicago in October 2015. The extensive media coverage that followed, supported by videos of nilotinib-treated participants getting up and walking from their wheelchairs, suggested that disease modification in PD was within reach with this drug. The corresponding publication documented that,...
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(Northwestern University) The Nilotinib in Parkinson's Disease (NILO-PD) study showed that nilotinib, an FDA-approved treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia being tested for potential repurposing as a Parkinson's drug, was safe and tolerable in its trial population of 76 participants with moderate to advanced Parkinson's but does not exert a clinically meaningful benefit or biological effect to benefit those with Parkinson's disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionMiR ‐563 plays a tumor suppressive role in lung cancer progression via targeting oncogenic LIN28B.
Source: Thoracic Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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