Soothe Your Stress Away with Music

If you regularly turn to music intuitively to relieve stress, you certainly aren’t alone. You can definitely tap into the power of music to bring healing to yourself. Read along to discover the hidden psychological benefits of music that will make you feel better in times of stress. If you are not a music lover, the treasure trove of hidden benefits below just might convert you to begin singing a new tune as your go-to stress reliever. Music can help relieve stress. In one 2013 study, participants took part in one of three conditions before being exposed to a stressor, and subsequently took a psychosocial stress test. Some participants listened to relaxing music, others listened to the sound of rippling water, and the rest received no auditory stimulation. The results suggested that listening to music had an impact on the human stress response, particularly the autonomic nervous system, otherwise known as our fight or flight system. Those who had listened to music tended to recover more quickly following any kind of stressor. Music can improve cognitive performance. Research suggests that background music can improve performance on cognitive tasks in older adults. Specifically, one study found that playing more upbeat music led to improvements in processing speed, while both upbeat and downbeat music led to benefits in memory. The trick is the music has to be more instrumental and less complicated, otherwise you will be more prone to distraction when completing your...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Creativity Memory and Perception Research Self-Help Stress Music Self Care stress management stress reduction Source Type: blogs

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Conclusion: Serum HEX activity in DT2 patients is a better marker of atherosclerosis than serum total cholesterol level in persons with mild symptoms of depression and anxiety. In DT2 patients, a routine testing of anxiety and depression is recommended. Early detection of these disorders creates the possibility for treatment, an improvement in a patient's quality of life, and the overall longevity of DT2 patients. PMID: 30026880 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Disease Markers - Category: Laboratory Medicine Tags: Dis Markers Source Type: research
Authors: Wróbel-Dudzińska D, Alio J, Rodriguez A, Suchodoła-Ratajewicz E, Kosior-Jarecka E, Rymgayłło-Jankowska B, Ćwiklińska-Haszcz A, Żarnowski T Abstract Purpose: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous blood product without preservatives and rich in proteins and growth factors which make it possible for cells to differentiate, proliferate, and migrate, thus stimulating healing and regeneration of tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of autologous platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy. Methods: The study group consists of 25 patients with...
Source: Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Tags: J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Women with STEMI are less likely to receive invasive management, revascularisation, or preventive medication at discharge. The reasons for these persistent differences in care require investigation. PMID: 30025513 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medical Journal of Australia - Category: General Medicine Tags: Med J Aust Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2018Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian StudiesAuthor(s): Seyed Saeed Najafi, Setareh Nazaribin, Marzieh Momennasab, Amin Kordi Yoosefinejad
Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
I recently submitted a manuscript to a journal. After the usual delay as the reviewers commented on my draft, I received the feedback – one comment stood out to me: “the references are quite old”. I scurried around to find some more recent references and resubmitted, but as I did, I started pondering this drive to continually draw on recent research even if the findings of the older references had not been superseded. There is a sense that maybe journal editors and perhaps people reading the journals think that old research has no merit. As someone who relishes reading about the history of pain and pain m...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Back pain Low back pain Professional topics history Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe present pattern of results suggests that glutamatergic medications such as gabapentin and memantine adjuvant to a standard treatment with an SSRI have no additional positive impact on patients with OCD, as measured with the Y-BOCS. Additionally, side-effects were reported. Future studies should use more fine-grained tools to assess, for example, patients' sleep and cognitive functioning, and patients' view of symptoms.
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Kawada T PMID: 30027878 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The British Journal of Psychiatry for Mental Science - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Br J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Bulbena-Cabre A, Bulbena A PMID: 30027877 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The British Journal of Psychiatry for Mental Science - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Br J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Fancourt D, Steptoe A, Cadar D Abstract SummaryTheories of cognitive reserve, disuse syndrome and stress have suggested that activities that are mentally engaging, enjoyable and socially interactive could be protective against the development of dementia. Using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, this study shows that for adults aged 50 and older visiting museums every few months or more was associated with a lower incidence rate of dementia over a 10-year follow-up period compared with less-frequent visiting. This association was independent of demographics, socioeconomic status, health-re...
Source: The British Journal of Psychiatry for Mental Science - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Br J Psychiatry Source Type: research
DISCUSSION: Midlife insomnia and late-life terminal insomnia or long sleep duration were associated with a higher late-life dementia risk. PMID: 30030112 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
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