Did you visit New York City this month? Health officials would like a word.

The New York State Department of Health wants people in the New York City area to know that an Australian tourist confirmed to have measles visited numerous hotels and the Metropolitan Museum of Art from Feb. 16 to 21. Measles is notoriously contagious for people without immunity to the disease, with a 90 percent infection rate […]Related:A mother Googled her toddler’s symptoms — and believes it may have saved the child’s lifeHere’s what you should know about the flu season this yearFlu cases fall for the first time this awful influenza season
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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TTP, a technology company based in Melbourn, UK, is developing a handheld PCR (polymerase chain reaction) diagnostic device that can rapidly detect influenza viruses, and one day other viruses, in samples of nasal mucus. The company claims that the s...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs
Bacterial, viral, or overall infection was associated with increased Parkinson's disease risk.Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis C virus, Malassezia, and pneumoniae infection were positively associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease. However, infection of herpes virus, hepatitis B virus, pertussis, scarlet fever, mumps, chicken pox, influenza virus, measles, and German measles was not. AbstractAimsRecent studies showed that patients with various bacterial, viral, and fungal infections might be at increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the risk of PD in patients with each specific infection varied. This meta...
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
It's too soon to know for sure how the tale of the novel coronavirus will play out,but at this point we have a pretty good idea. A stipulation in both of the scenarios at the linked essay is that yeah, it gets loose into the wild and eventually can show up anywhere in the world. I think that's pretty much definitely going to happen if it hasn't already.Scenario number 1, and most likely, in my view, it will just be one more virus that causes what amounts to a common cold and in a few people who are otherwise debilitated goes on to be complicated by pneumonia. In that case, for a year or two it will circulate as a novel vir...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
Bacterial, viral, or overall infection was associated with increased Parkinson's disease risk.Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis C virus, Malassezia, and pneumoniae infection were positively associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease. However, infection of herpes virus, hepatitis B virus, pertussis, scarlet fever, mumps, chicken pox, influenza virus, measles, and German measles was not. AbstractAimsRecent studies showed that patients with various bacterial, viral, and fungal infections might be at increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the risk of PD in patients with each specific infection varied. This meta...
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
Authors: Albertsen N, Lynge AR, Skovgaard N, Olesen JS, Pedersen ML Abstract In order to estimate the current coverage rate among all children in Greenland, we conducted an observational cross-sectional study identifying all children in Greenland eligible for a vaccination between 1 March 2018 and 16 June 2019. we found an overall national coverage of 85.4%. The national coverage for the vaccinations given at birth was 97.1%, dropping to 94.3%, 87.7% and 83.6% at ages 3, 5 and 12 months. Among children eligible for the Measles, Mumps and Rubella-vaccinations, the national coverage was 76.9% for children aged 15 mon...
Source: International Journal of Circumpolar Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Int J Circumpolar Health Source Type: research
A rapidly evolving health story broke in late December when a novel illness originating in Wuhan, China made the news. Reports of the number of infected people swiftly rose, and isolated cases of this new coronavirus — dubbed 2019-nCoV by scientists — have appeared in several countries due to international travel. At this writing, almost 1,300 confirmed cases and over 40 deaths have occurred in China, according to an article in the New York Times. Fortunately, public health officials in many countries, including the US, have put measures in place to help prevent further spread of the virus. These measures inclu...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
You’ve done it! You’ve taken that last birth control pill, removed your IUD, or stopped using your contraceptive method of choice. You’ve made the decision to try to conceive a pregnancy, and while this is an exciting time in your life, it can also feel overwhelming. There is so much advice around fertility and pregnancy, and sifting through it all just isn’t possible. For many mothers, their goals crystallize around ensuring that their baby is healthy. Evidence-based steps that may prevent birth defects January is Birth Defects Prevention Month, so we want to focus on things you can do to reduce th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy Fertility Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother's antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age. Findings from the preclinical study were published online today in Science Translational Medicine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
AbstractThe role of vaccination in the development of Guillain-Barr é syndrome (GBS) is controversial, although cases of GBS have been reported following a wide range of vaccines. A nested case–control study was conducted between January 2011 and December 2015 in three Chinese cities. Four controls were matched to a case by gender, age, address and index date. An independent expert committee validated the diagnoses of cases and controls according to the Brighton Collaboration GBS case definition. Data on vaccinations were obtained from computerized vaccination records. Causal relations were assessed by conditi...
Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
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