Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS): Hope for stubborn depression

Depression is the leading cause of disability in the United States among people ages 15 to 44. While there are many effective treatments for depression, first-line approaches such as antidepressants and psychotherapy do not work for everyone. In fact, approximately two-thirds of people with depression don’t get adequate relief from the first antidepressant they try. After 2 months of treatment, at least some symptoms will remain for these individuals, and each subsequent medication tried is actually less likely to help than the one prior. What can people with depression do when they do not respond to first-line treatments? For several decades, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT or “shock therapy”) was the gold standard for treatment-resistant depression. In fact, ECT is still considered to be the most potent and effective treatment for this condition, and it continues to be used regularly across the country. For many people with depression, however, ECT can be too difficult to tolerate due to side effects on memory and cognition. For those individuals and the many others who have had an inadequate response to medications and therapy alone, there is a newer treatment option called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). What is transcranial magnetic stimulation? Transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS, is a noninvasive form of brain stimulation. TMS devices operate completely outside of the body and affect central nervous system activity by applying powerful m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Mental Health Source Type: blogs

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This article reviews the history of the U.S. Supreme Court's rulings on intellectual disability in capital cases, highlighting the difficulty states have had in devising a workable definition that meets constitutional standards. The Court's decisions in Penry v. Lynaugh (1989), Atkins v. Virginia (2002), and Hall v. Florida (2014) are briefly summarized. Next, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals' ruling in Ex parte Briseno (2004) is discussed as a prelude to the Supreme Court's decision in Moore v. Texas I (2017). On remand, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals interpreted the Supreme Court's Moore I ruling in a manner that...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law - Category: Medical Law Tags: J Am Acad Psychiatry Law Source Type: research
This article reviews implications of cannabis use for defendants' eligibility and participation in problem-solving courts, with a focus on adult drug courts and mental health courts. This article also examines a range of policies, such as abstinence-based, tolerance-based, and adaptive approaches, that problem-solving courts may consider implementing. Further research is needed to characterize existing problem-solving court policies toward cannabis use and to develop evidence-based practices that courts may follow. PMID: 31533992 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law - Category: Medical Law Tags: J Am Acad Psychiatry Law Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience - Category: Nanotechnology Authors: Tags: research-article Source Type: research
Authors: Moon JR, Lee CK, Hong SN, Im JP, Ye BD, Cha JM, Jung SA, Lee KM, Park DI, Jeen YT, Park YS, Cheon JH, Kim H, Seo B, Kim Y, Kim HJ, MOSAIK study group of the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) Abstract Background/Aims: Limited data are available regarding psychosocial distress at the time of diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC). We investigated the psychosocial burden and factors related to poor health-related quality of life (HRQL) among patients newly diagnosed with moderate-to-severe UC who were affiliated with the nationwide prospective cohort study. Methods: Within the ...
Source: Gut and Liver - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gut Liver Source Type: research
Conclusion: Emergency SBE under general anesthesia achieves higher diagnosis and detection rates, and fewer adverse events under conscious sedation, when compared to nonemergency SBE, regardless of the route. For patients with overt bleeding, it is easier to find lesions by emergency SBE within 24 hours. PMID: 31534450 [PubMed]
Source: Gastroenterology Research and Practice - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterol Res Pract Source Type: research
The goal of this proposed initiative is to identify feasible approaches to telehealth-supplied suicide prevention practices, and how this consultation affects patient suicide-related outcomes that include intentional and non-intentional injuries and mortality, and suicide related-health utilization patterns.
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Nakamura H, Utsunomiya A, Ishida Y, Horita T Abstract A 48-year-old man was brought to our emergency room with acute abdominal pain and systemic edema, indicating acute circulatory failure with lactic acidosis. Furosemide treatment paradoxically worsened the systemic edema and induced confusion. He had no drinking history but hardly ate legumes or meats containing thiamine. Administration of fursultiamine dramatically improved the symptoms and subsequently caused pulmonary edema. Thiamine deficiency may occur in nondrinkers with an unbalanced diet. In this condition, diuretic therapy can worsen the symptom...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Authors: Hosoda T, Uehara Y, Naito T Abstract Patients with HIV infection represent a high-risk group for medication overdose because of the high frequency of complicating psychiatric disorders. Raltegravir is well-known for its low frequency of adverse effects. We herein report a 42-year-old Japanese man with HIV infection who was hospitalized 6 hours after overdosing with 24,000 mg of raltegravir in a suicide attempt. No serious adverse events occurred, although the plasma concentration of raltegravir at 18 hours after the overdose was 79,871.1 ng/mL. Raltegravir may be well-indicated for HIV patients at risk of ...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Authors: Fukushima K, Yanagisawa N, Sekiya N, Izumiya H Abstract Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection is a major pathogen causing gastroenteritis among immunocompetent adults. NTS infection is mainly transmitted by contaminated food and water, but some cases are transmitted by animal contact. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Poona (S. Poona) is an NTS usually transmitted by reptiles, and cases including outbreaks of gastroenteritis have been reported previously. However, invasive infections due to this organism among immunocompetent adults are rare. We herein report a case of a 39-year-old man who wa...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
We describe the case of a 52-year-old female outpatient who developed OIC while receiving oxycodone for pain due to cancer with multiple bone metastases. Although she did not have brain metastasis, opioid withdrawal syndrome (OWS) developed after taking naldemedine orally. Her Clinical Opiate-Withdrawal Score (COWS) was 19 (moderate symptoms). However, she recovered from OWS on intravenous fentanyl and a continuous infusion of oxycodone. She did not develop OWS thereafter and was discharged two days after recovery. PMID: 31534081 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
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