Doctors As Patients

I think doctor's make the worst patients. A friend's father, she told me, was a doctor but ignored his own cancer symptoms and said he was fine until he wasn't. I have never met a doctor who rushed to be a patient....But I think the best training for a doctor is to be a patient - particularly a patient of the disease or ailment they treat. This would provide so much more understanding for them.Here is the story ofa British breast cancer surgeon who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015 and finally returned to work in 2017. She never expected to face this diagnosis. I don't anyone ever does." Doctors face particular challenges when they become patients —challenges that they are rarely prepared for. It is hard to relinquish control and allow others to dictate the treatments that you yourself are used to doling out. It is crushing to know your own prognosis in the starkest terms—a 65 percent chance of surviving for 10 years, in O’Riordan’s c ase. It is awkward to see your own former patients while you’re being treated: To strike up a chat would break confidentiality. "I would like to disagree here. I don't think it would be awkward to see your own patients while in treatment. I would not expect my doctor to treat me as a patient if I run into them in the store or something. I just say hello as I would with any other person." And it is difficult to be cut off from the same supportive forums and networks that other patients use to sh...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient breast cancer treatment doctors surgery Source Type: blogs

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CONCLUSIONS: T3b, distinguished from minimal ETE, may be related to larger tumor size, higher prevalence of multifocality, LNM, DM, recurrence and worse RFS than no ETE, but it may not affect OS and may not independently predict recurrence in PTC patients. PMID: 31830859 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Thyroid : official journal of the American Thyroid Association - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Thyroid Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The clinical content and evidence explanations in the adult thyroid nodule and differentiated thyroid cancer CPG are widely accepted and applied among ATA survey respondents. Future ATA CPG updates need to be optimized to best meet users' preferences regarding format, frequency and length. PMID: 31830853 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Thyroid : official journal of the American Thyroid Association - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Thyroid Source Type: research
This study aimed to explore whether a correlation exists between the incidence and mortality of cancers and normalized internet search volumes on the big data platform, Baidu. We also assessed whether the distribution of people who searched for specific types of cancer differed by gender. Finally, we determined whether there were regional disparities among people who searched the Web for cancer-related information. Methods: Standard Boolean operators were used to choose search terms for each type of cancer. Spearman’s correlation analysis was used to explore correlations among monthly search index values for each can...
Source: Journal of Medical Internet Research - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Author Affiliations open 1 McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 2 Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Barcelona, Spain 3 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain 4 CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain 5 School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 6 Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 7 Department of Economics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA 8 Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Cana...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Nature contact may offer a range of human health benefits. Although much evidence is already available, much remains unknown. A robust research effort, guided by a focus on key unanswered questions, has the potential to yield high-impact, consequential public health insights. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1663 Received: 26 January 2017 Revised: 12 May 2017 Accepted: 25 May 2017 Published: 31 July 2017 Address correspondence to H. Frumkin, Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Public Health, Box 354695, Seattle, WA 98195-4695 USA; Telephone: 206-897-1723;...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 June 2016 Source:Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology Author(s): Peter N. Lee, Alison J. Thornton, Janette S. Hamling We reviewed 87 epidemiological studies relating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure to risk of cancer other than lung or breast in never smoking adults. This updates a 2002 review which also considered breast cancer. Meta-analysis showed no significant relationship with ETS for nasopharynx cancer, head and neck cancer, various digestive cancers (stomach, rectum, colorectal, liver, pancreas), or cancers of endometrium, ovary, bladder and brain. For some can...
Source: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology - Category: Toxicology Source Type: research
Abstract We reviewed 87 epidemiological studies relating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure to risk of cancer other than lung or breast in never smoking adults. This updates a 2002 review which also considered breast cancer. Meta-analysis showed no significant relationship with ETS for nasopharynx cancer, head and neck cancer, various digestive cancers (stomach, rectum, colorectal, liver, pancreas), or cancers of endometrium, ovary, bladder and brain. For some cancers (including oesophagus, colon, gall bladder and lymphoma) more limited data did not suggest a relationship. An increased cervix cancer risk (...
Source: Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology : RTP - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: Regul Toxicol Pharmacol Source Type: research
Using a time-dependent approach, we investigated all-site and site-specific cancer incidence in a large population stratified by diabetes status. The study analyzed a closed cohort comprised of Israelis aged 21–89 years, enrolled in a health fund, and followed from 2002 to 2012. Adjusting for age, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, we calculated hazard ratios for cancer incidence using Cox regression separately for participants with prevalent and incident diabetes; the latter was further divided by time since diabetes diagnosis. Of the 2,186,196 individuals included in the analysis, 159,104 were classified as havin...
Source: American Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH-ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abstract Using a time-dependent approach, we investigated all-site and site-specific cancer incidence in a large population stratified by diabetes status. The study analyzed a closed cohort comprised of Israelis aged 21-89 years, enrolled in a health fund, and followed from 2002 to 2012. Adjusting for age, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, we calculated hazard ratios for cancer incidence using Cox regression separately for participants with prevalent and incident diabetes; the latter was further divided by time since diabetes diagnosis. Of the 2,186,196 individuals included in the analysis, 159,104 were classif...
Source: Am J Epidemiol - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: Am J Epidemiol Source Type: research
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