Brain scan and artificial intelligence could help predict whether OCD will improve with treatment

Washing hands needlessly dozens of times of day. Spending so much time perfecting schoolwork that it never gets turned in.These are typical behaviors for people with obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD, a lifelong illness marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair work performance, relationships and quality of life. OCD is most commonly treated with medication and a form of psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy. Unfortunately, cognitive behavioral therapy does not help everyone with OCD, and the treatment can be expensive and time-consuming.Now, UCLA researchers have developed a way to use brain scans and machine learning — a form of artificial intelligence — to predict whether people with OCD will benefit from cognitive behavior therapy. The technique could help improve the overall success rate of cognitive behavioral therapy, and it could enable therapists to tailor treatment to each patient.A paper describing the work appears in the Feb. 12 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“If the results of this study are replicated in future studies, the methods we used could potentially give clinicians a new predictive tool,” said Nicco Reggente, a UCLA doctoral student and the study’s first author. “If a patient is predicted to be a non-responder to cognitive behavioral th erapy, clinicians could pursue different options.”Using a functional MRI machine, or fMRI, the researchers scanned the brains of 42 people with OCD,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news