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Science News » NIMH Twitter Chat on Seasonal Affective Disorder

On February 20, 2018, join NIMH for a Twitter chat on Seasonal Affective Disorder with expert Dr. Matthew Rudorfer.
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: news

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Two studies shed new light on seasonal affective disorder, concluding that brown-eyed women may be particularly prone to the condition.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Depression Source Type: news
Researchers at the University of South Wales found those with dark eyes were at twice the risk of seasonal affective disorder - also known as SAD - than men with blue eyes.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Sleep problems are commonly reported in seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the specific characteristics of sleep difficulties differ. Frequent sleep problems in MDD are insomnia and night awakenings, whereas SAD patients complain of hypersomnia and daytime sleepiness. No earlier studies have reported differences in sleep functioning between these two disorders.
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Depression and Anxiety, EarlyView.
Source: Depression and Anxiety - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
Light therapy is the treatment of a disorder by exposure to electromagnetic radiation in and close by the visible spectrum (i.e., visible, ultraviolet and infrared radiation). Depending on the type of ailment, treatment is mediated through the skin or through the eyes. This paper only focus on light mediated through the eyes, used in the treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or circadian related issues like jet-lag.
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
Light therapy is the treatment of a disorder by exposure to electromagnetic radiation in and close by the visible spectrum (i.e., visible, ultraviolet and infrared radiation). Depending on the type of ailment, treatment is mediated through the skin or through the eyes. This paper only focus on light mediated through the eyes, used in the treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or circadian related issues like jet-lag.
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
This article is a contribution to a special issue on Circadian Rhythms in Regulation of Brain Processes and Role in Psychiatric Disorders curated by editors Shimon Amir, Karen Gamble, Oliver Stork, and Harry Pantazopoulos. PMID: 29593784 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
The use of light for its antidepressant action dates back to the  beginnings of civilization. As early as 4700 y ago, Wong Tai mentioned the fluctuation of diseases with seasons, Hippocrates wrote on the interrelation between seasonal climates and mood (melancholia and mania) [1], and Aretaeus of Cappadocia prescribed, in the second century AD, that “Lethargi cs be laid in the light, and exposed to the rays of the sun, for the disease is gloom”. While being reported for millennia, bright light therapy (BLT) in depression was not officially recognized until 30 y ago for treating the Seasonal Affec...
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
The use of light for its antidepressant action dates back to the beginnings of civilization. As early as 4700 years ago, Wong Tai mentioned the fluctuation of diseases with seasons, Hippocrates wrote on the interrelation between seasonal climates and mood (melancholia and mania) [1], and Aretaeus of Cappadocia prescribed, in the second century AD, that “Lethargics be laid in the light, and exposed to the rays of the sun, for the disease is gloom”. While being reported for millennia, bright light therapy (BLT) in depression was not officially recognized until 30 years ago for treating the Seasonal Affective Diso...
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
Abstract Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), beyond mood changes, is characterized by alterations in daily rhythms of behavior and physiology. The pathophysiological conditions of SAD involve changes in day length and its first-line treatment is bright light therapy. Animal models using nocturnal rodents have been studied to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms of depression, but might be ill suited to study the therapeutic effects of light in SAD since they exhibit light-aversive responses. Here Arvicanthis ansorgei, a diurnal rodent, was used to determine behavioral, molecular and brain dopamine changes in re...
Source: Brain Structure and Function - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Brain Struct Funct Source Type: research
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