Science News » NIMH Twitter Chat on Seasonal Affective Disorder

On February 20, 2018, join NIMH for a Twitter chat on Seasonal Affective Disorder with expert Dr. Matthew Rudorfer.
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: news

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Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a recurrent illness affecting around 5% of the population at temperate latitudes (Rosenthal et  al., 1984; Lewy et al., 2009). Most frequently, patients experience depressive symptoms during fall and winter, with full remission to normal mood or switch into hypo/mania during spring and summer (Lam et al., 1995; Zauderer and Ganzer, 2015). This predominant manifestation of SAD is called win ter depression (Magnusson and Boivin, 2003).
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
We have recently shown that the emergence and severity of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) symptoms in the winter is associated with an increase in cerebral serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) binding. Intriguingly, we also found that individuals resilient to SAD downregulate their cerebral SERT binding in the winter. In the present paper, we provide an analysis of the SERT- and 5-HT dynamics as indexed by 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) binding related to successful stress coping. We included 46 11C-DASB positron emission tomography (PET) scans (N  = 23, 13 women, age: 26 ± 6 years) and 14 11C-SB207145 PET s...
Source: European Neuropsychopharmacology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Cools O, Hebbrecht K, Coppens V, Roosens L, De Witte A, Morrens M, Neels H, Sabbe B Abstract INTRODUCTION: A seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of unipolar and bipolar major depressive disorders. It is characterized by its annual recurrence of depressive episodes at a particular season, mostly seen in winter and is responsible for 10-20% of the prevalence of major depressive disorders. Some pathophysiological hypotheses, such as the phase delay and the monoamine depletion hypotheses, have been postulated but the exact cause has not been fully unraveled yet. Studies on treatment for SAD in the l...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
When my son Dan was dealing with severe OCD, he would often be awake all night, pacing throughout the house. It was not unusual for me to get up in the morning and find him fast asleep on the living room floor, or wherever else he happened to finally collapse from exhaustion. Even when his symptoms began to improve, he still could not seem to fall asleep at a normal hour and would be awake until 4:00 am or so. Not surprisingly he’d then sleep half the day away. His sleep cycle was all out of whack. It turns out that this abnormal sleep pattern is not unusual in those with OCD and has warranted the attention of resea...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits OCD Personal Research Sleep Circadian Rhythm Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Seasonal Affective Disorder Sunlight Sunshine Source Type: blogs
Authors: Wirz-Justice A, Ajdacic V, Rössler W, Steinhausen HC, Angst J Abstract The prevalence of autumn/winter seasonality in depression has been documented in the longitudinal Zurich cohort study by five comprehensive diagnostic interviews at intervals over more than 20 years (N = 499). Repeated winter major depressive episodes (MDE-unipolar + bipolar) showed a prevalence of 3.44% (5× more women than men), whereas MDE with a single winter episode was much higher (9.96%). A total of 7.52% suffered from autumn/winter seasonality in major and minor depressive mood states. ...
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
Abstract Identifying objectively measurable seasonal changes in 24-h activity patterns (rest-activity rhythms or RARs) that occur in seasonal affective disorder (SAD) could help guide research and practice towards new monitoring tools or prevention targets. We quantified RARs from actigraphy data using non-parametric and extended cosine based approaches, then compared RARs between people with SAD and healthy controls in the summer (n = 70) and winter seasons (n = 84). We also characterized the within-person seasonal RAR changes that occurred in the SAD (n = 19) and control (n =&n...
Source: Chronobiology International - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Chronobiol Int Source Type: research
AbstractThe prevalence of autumn/winter seasonality in depression has been documented in the longitudinal Zurich cohort study by five comprehensive diagnostic interviews at intervals over more than 20  years (N = 499). Repeated winter major depressive episodes (MDE—unipolar + bipolar) showed a prevalence of 3.44% (5× more women than men), whereas MDE with a single winter episode was much higher (9.96%). A total of 7.52% suffered from autumn/winter seasonality in major and minor depressive mood states. The clinical interviews revealed novel findings: high comorbidity of Social An...
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Economic Psychology, Volume 66Author(s): Tae-Young Pak, Patryk BabiarzAbstractThe association between cognitive aging and portfolio reallocation towards riskless assets is well documented. Past studies have suggested several mechanisms such as rising information costs or preference changes to explain the shift away from financial risk. However, these narratives appear to be at odds with the evidence that some domains of cognitive functions improve with age, and many individuals are not cognizant of their intellectual decline. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, thi...
Source: Journal of Economic Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), first described in 1984 (Rosenthal, 2009), is not considered to be a separate and unique mood disorder, but rather to be a specifier of major depressive disorder (Lurie et al. 2006). The overall prevalence of SAD is thought to range from 0% to 9.7% (Lurie et al. 2006). This estimate varies based on the specific population being studied and whether the disorder is diagnosed by a screening questionnaire or a more rigorous clinical interview (Lurie et al. 2006). The clinical presentation of SAD comprises the following (Rosenthal, 2009): patients are predominantly women who become regularly d...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Journal of Economic Psychology, Volume 66Author(s): Tae-Young Pak, Patryk BabiarzAbstractThe association between cognitive aging and portfolio reallocation towards riskless assets is well documented. Past studies have suggested several mechanisms such as rising information costs or preference changes to explain the shift away from financial risk. However, these narratives appear to be at odds with the evidence that some domains of cognitive functions improve with age, and many individuals are not cognizant of their intellectual decline. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, thi...
Source: Journal of Economic Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
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