Starting your period early increases your risk of stroke

Researchers from the Brigham and Women's Hospital add to evidence that an early menopause causes strokes due to women experiencing less 'protective' hormones, such as oestrogen.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Objective: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS) during menopausal transition have been linked to a higher burden of cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical vascular disease, and subsequent vascular events. We aim to investigate the association of VMS with the extent of coronary disease and their prognostic role after an acute coronary syndrome. Methods: The Ladies Acute Coronary Syndrome study enrolled consecutive women with an acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary angiography. A menopause questionnaire was administered during admission. Angiographic data underwent corelab analysis. Six out of 10 enrolling centers particip...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
GG Abstract Stroke prevalence is expected to increase in the next decades due to the aging of the Western population. Ischemic stroke (IS) shows an age- and sex-dependent distribution in which men represent the most affected population within 65 years of age, being passed by post-menopausal women in older age groups. Furthermore, a sexual dimorphism concerning risk factors, presentation and treatment of IS has been widely recognized. In order to address these phenomena, a number of issue have been raised involving both socio-economical and biological factors. The latter can be either dependent on sex hormones or ...
Source: Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Front Neuroendocrinol Source Type: research
GG Abstract Stroke prevalence is expected to increase in the next decades due to the aging of the Western population. Ischemic stroke (IS) shows an age- and sex-dependent distribution in which men represent the most affected population within 65 years of age, being passed by post-menopausal women in older age groups. Furthermore, a sexual dimorphism concerning risk factors, presentation and treatment of IS has been widely recognized. In order to address these phenomena, a number of issue have been raised involving both socio-economical and biological factors. The latter can be either dependent on sex hormones or ...
Source: Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Front Neuroendocrinol Source Type: research
This article explores stroke risk factors experienced exclusively by women, including exogenous estrogens, pregnancy, parity, and menopause.Stroke
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news
Conclusions: Discontinuation of postmenopausal HT may be associated with increased risk of cardiac and stroke death in the first posttreatment year. Further investigation is required to evaluate causality of the observed associations.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
We present the case of a 44-years-old patient undergoing early menopause, who was diagnosed with cervical tumor of the serous adenocarcinoma type. The patient underwent external radiotherapy, and, in the seventh day of treatment, she suffered a frontal-temporal-parietal ischemic stroke with left hemiplegia. The blood testing highlighted procoagulant products (double fibrinogen compared to normal values, deficit of antithrombin and a high number of thrombocytes). The patient received neurological and rehabilitation treatment, at first with Heparin, followed by the administration of an antiaggregant. During this treatment, t...
Source: Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology - Category: General Medicine Tags: Rom J Morphol Embryol Source Type: research
AbstractCardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, incidence and death increases from around the time of menopause comparing to women in reproductive age. A healthy lifestyle can prevent CVD, but it is unclear which lifestyle factors may help maintain and improve cardiovascular health for women after menopausal transition. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to evaluate the association between modifiable lifestyle factors (specifically smoking, physical activity, alcohol intake, and obesity), with CVD and mortality in middle-aged and elderly women. Pubmed, Embase, among other da...
Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Several myths surrounding heart diseases state that heart diseases attract only elder people and more men than women are prone to heart attacks. Contrary to the belief, cardiovascular cases are on rise in women than men and it is deadlier than all forms of cancers combined. Both physiological and psychological factors are causing heart diseases and it affects people of all ages with no bias. Women that have suffered from mental illness are more susceptible to attract heart risks like stroke. Mental ill health like schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and bipolar disorders are mostly treated with antidepressants, antipsychotics...
Source: Sciences Blog - Category: Science Authors: Tags: OMICS Anxiety Disorders bipolar disorders cardiovascular cases heart attacks heart diseases psychological factors Source Type: blogs
ConclusionMultifactorial mechanisms lead to UUI and vascular risk factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder overactivity in addition to higher BMI. Severe UUI appears to be a distinct presentation with more specific contributory mechanisms than milder UUI.
Source: BJU International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewMenopause is a life-changing event in numerous ways. Many women with migraine hold hope that the transition to the climacteric state will coincide with a cessation or improvement of migraine. This assumption is based mainly on common lay perceptions as well as assertions from many in the healthcare community. Unfortunately, evidence suggests this is far from the rule. Many women turn to a general practitioner or a headache specialist for prognosis and management. A natural instinct is to manipulate the offending agent, but in some cases, this approach backfires, or the concern for adverse events ou...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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