Medical News Today: Stroke: Could looking into the eyes help with diagnosis?

A contrast agent given to stroke survivors undergoing MRI brain scans can leak into the eyes and may help to improve diagnosis and treatment.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 9 December 2019Source: NeuroImage: ClinicalAuthor(s): Yunzhe Xue, Fadi G. Farhat, Olga Boukrina, A.M. Barrett, Jeffrey R. Binder, Usman W. Roshan, William W. GravesAbstractAutomatic identification of brain lesions from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of stroke survivors would be a useful aid in patient diagnosis and treatment planning. It would also greatly facilitate the study of brain-behavior relationships by eliminating the laborious step of having a human expert manually segment the lesion on each brain scan. We propose a multi-modal multi-path convolutional neural network sys...
Source: NeuroImage: Clinical - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Shah Islam Hugh Harvey By HUGH HARVEY, MBBS and SHAH ISLAM, MBBS AI in medical imaging entered the consciousness of radiologists just a few years ago, notably peaking in 2016 when Geoffrey Hinton declared radiologists’ time was up, swiftly followed by the first AI startups booking exhibiting booths at RSNA. Three years on, the sheer number and scale of AI-focussed offerings has gathered significant pace, so much so that this year a decision was made by the RSNA organising committee to move the ever-growing AI showcase to a new space located in the lower level of the North Hall. In some ways it made sense to ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Start-Ups AI Hugh Harvey Radiology RSNA RSNA 2019 RSNA19 Shah Islam Source Type: blogs
Can you distinguish the taste of a red wine versus a rosé? How about the look of a 1960s muscle car versus a foreign import? Do you prefer to grow lilies or tulips? Would you rather listen to Dark Side of the Moon or “Fly Me to the Moon”? To answer any of these questions, you need to use your semantic memory. Your semantic memory is your store of factual knowledge of the world and the meaning of words. It’s how you know that a fork is for eating (not twirling your hair) and what color a lion is. It’s both the source of your vocabulary and how you know what something does even if you don&rsquo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Healthy Aging Memory Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Oral health measured by number of tooth extractions>10 was an independent predictor for cerebral infarction in addition to age, HDL-C, hs-C-reactive protein and diabetes. The pattern of risk factors varied between the specific stroke diagnoses. PMID: 31814529 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Scand J Public Health Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our results suggest that in this community-dwelling population, a higher CAA score is related to cognitive impairment and a higher risk of stroke, dementia, and death. The composite CAA score can be used to practically quantify the severity of vascular brain injury.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
DiscussionThis review will be the first to report and summarise the risk for and incidence of PPC in adult patients with MetS undergoing surgery across a range of surgical specialities. The results have the potential to inform the development of evidenced-based interventions to improve the management of PPC in the surgical patient with MetS. Findings from this systematic review and meta-analysis will inform a subsequent Delphi study on priorities and responses to PPC in patients with MetS. We will also disseminate our results through publication in scientific peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and promotion t...
Source: Systematic Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Background: Controversial evidence suggests that right insular stroke may be associated with worse outcomes compared to the left insular ischemic lesion. Objectives: We investigated whether lateralization of insular stroke is associated with early and late outcome in terms of in-hospital complications, stroke recurrence, cardiovascular events, and death. Methods: Data were prospectively collected from the Athens Stroke Registry. Insular cortex involvement was identified based on brain CT scans or MRI images.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionSymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) following systemic thrombolysis for ischemic stroke is often devastating, and open surgical evacuation is considered dangerous due to the increased risk of perioperative bleeding, and stereotactic placement of a catheter is too time-consuming. We therefore evaluated the feasibility of a free-hand bedside catheter technique for emergency hematoma evacuation.MethodsPatients who had a supratentorial sICH after thrombolysis, a hematoma volume  >  30 ml, and an ensuing reduction in vigilance were consecutively treated with acute minimally inva...
Source: Neurocritical Care - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Introduction: Carotid endarterectomy is an established surgical intervention that is associatedwith a reduction in the future risk of stroke in symptomatic patients. However, the identification of culprit carotid plaque remains challenging for number of reasons including the suboptimal evaluation of carotid plaque morphology, disease activity and future stroke risk stratification.
Source: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Introduction: The risk of stroke is high shortly after the index symptoms in patients with carotid disease. This indicates that unstable carotid plaques stabilizes over time, which may be due to changes in composition and inflammatory activity. Inflammation is thought to be one of the leading causes in atherosclerotic plaques destabilizing leading to thrombosis. With positron emission tomography (PET) previous studies have shown increased uptake of the glucose analogue tracer [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in symptomatic compared to asymptomatic carotid plaques.
Source: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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