Patient participation in hand hygiene among health professionals.

CONCLUSION: HPs showed limited knowledge about HH, opposing recommendations on the topic. The contradiction between the HPs acceptance and attitude when questioned by the patient regarding HH was revealed, reflecting a lack of knowledge about the WHO program and the need to implement educational practices in health. PMID: 29412281 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Rev Bras Enferm Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Pathology - Research and PracticeAuthor(s): Shun Wang, Jun Jiang, Chao Zhang, Xuhua Zhang, Chuanxin WangAbstractBackgroundLincRNA-p21 is involved in the initiation and progression of many human diseases. We aimed to investigate the expression of LincRNA-p21 in different types of liver diseases.MethodsSerum from patients with primary liver diseases (chronic HBV or HCV infection, hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis, hepatitis B virus-related HCC, non-HBV/HCV-related HCC, alcoholic liver disease) and HBV negative liver metastatic cancer and control healthy individuals ...
Source: Pathology Research and Practice - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
The spectrum of alcohol-related liver diseases (ALD) includes steatosis, steatohepatitis, progressive liver fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a recently defined entity that occurs in patients with chronic liver diseases and is characterised by acute decompensation, organ failures and a high risk of short-term mortality. Active alcohol consumption, alcoholic hepatitis and bacterial infections are the most frequent events precipitating the development of ACLF in the context of ALD (ALD-ACLF).
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
The overall landscape of clinical hepatology has markedly evolved in the last few years. Recent major advances in the management of viral hepatitis B and C with highly effective therapies are decreasing the proportion of patients with viral-related end-stage liver disease in many countries.1 Consequently, increasing attention is being paid to fatty liver diseases (both alcohol-related liver disease [ALD] and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease [NAFLD]) as the main current and future driver of liver-related health burdens.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Histological fibrosis stage is one of the most important prognostic factors in compensated and decompensated alcohol-related liver disease (ALD). Morphological assessment of fibrosis is useful for patient stratification, enabling individualised management, and for evaluation of treatment effects in clinical studies. In contrast to most chronic liver diseases where fibrosis is portal-based, fatty liver disease (FLD) of alcoholic or non-alcoholic aetiology (NAFLD) is associated with a centrilobular pattern of injury which leads to perivenular fibrosis and/or pericellular fibrosis.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Even though alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of severe liver disease worldwide, most patients with ALD are diagnosed at the decompensation stage. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard for establishing a definite diagnosis and assessing the fibrosis stage of ALD, but it is an invasive procedure, associated with significant morbidity. During the last decade, non-invasive tests have been developed to estimate the severity of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Measurement of liver stiffness by transient elastography has become the most commonly used non-invasive parameter to evaluate fibrosis.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
While liver transplantation (LT) has become a standard therapy for life-threatening alcohol related cirrhosis, LT as a treatment for severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) has remained a taboo owing to concerns about the limited organ supply and the risk that the AH liver recipient will return to harmful drinking. The adoption of a 6-month abstinence requirement (the so-called ‘6-month rule’) by many centres made AH a contraindication to LT. Given the high short-term mortality of severe AH, the lack of effective medical therapies and an increasing recognition that the 6-month rule unfairly excluded otherwise favourabl...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
In some areas of medicine the clinical development pathway through phase II and III clinical trials has been well mapped out and refined through extensive experience. In contrast, a number of key questions remain unanswered in the development of novel therapeutics for alcoholic hepatitis. The use of mortality as an endpoint in phase II clinical trials will potentially restrict the appeal of this therapeutic area for pharmaceutical companies, as the number of patients required for adequately powered clinical trials becomes impractical.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Herein, we describe the evolving landscape of alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) including the current global burden of disease and cost to working-aged people in terms of death and disability, in addition to the larger spectrum of alcohol-related heath complications and its wider impact on society. We further review the most effective and cost-effective public health policies at both a population and individual level. Currently, abstinence is the only effective treatment for ALD, and yet because the majority of ALD remains undetected in the community abstinence is initiated too late to prevent premature death in the majority of cases.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Alcoholic hepatitis is a clinical syndrome in which patients present with acute-on-chronic liver failure and a high risk of short-term mortality. The current treatment of alcoholic hepatitis is suboptimal. Results recently published from the STOPAH study have improved our understanding of how best to design clinical trials for this condition. Although emerging data on liver transplantation for patients with alcoholic hepatitis are encouraging, less than 2% of these patients qualify. Clearly, there is an unmet need for novel treatments to improve the survival of these patients.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Inflammatory processes are primary contributors to the development and progression of alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), with severe alcoholic hepatitis characterised by non-resolving inflammation. Inflammation in the progression of ASH is a complex response to microbial dysbiosis, loss of barrier integrity in the intestine, hepatocellular stress and death, as well as inter-organ crosstalk. Herein, we review the roles of multiple cell types that are involved in inflammation in ASH, including resident macrophages and infiltrating monocytes, as well as other cell types in the innate and adaptive immune system.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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