What you should know about knee instability and dislocations in young athletes

Pain in the kneecap (patella) is very common in young athletes. It’s estimated that up to 15% of adolescents get some degree of patellofemoral pain. Most can be treated with rest, ice, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and sometimes rehab exercises. But instability of the patella — known as patellofemoral instability — is relatively less common, and more worrisome for children and adolescents. The term “patellofemoral instability” can refer to either a traumatic injury in which a person dislocates their patella, or just general instability in the knee that a person may feel or a physician may observe upon examination. In both cases, it’s important the individual receives the proper treatment in order to avoid long-term damage. Thriving talked to Dr. Matthew Milewski, a pediatric orthopedic sports medicine surgeon in Boston Children’s Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center, about what kids and parents should be aware of if they experience this knee condition. Are there certain sports that put an athlete more at risk for this injury? Patellar instability is incredibly common, some have reported it to be even more common than ACL injuries. We see it in a variety of different sports, and certainly in contact sports like football and lacrosse. But we also see it in jumping sports and sports that involve a significant amount of twisting, like basketball, volleyball, gymnastics and dance. It’s a little less common in spor...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Ask the Expert Dr. Matthew Milewski Orthopedic Center patellofemoral pain syndrome Sports Medicine Division Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Although being more challenging to patients, Exposure is an effective treatment, which can be delivered in a psychological treatment setting and should be offered as a short-term treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)
Source: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
You have a chronic illness that is debilitating and requires meticulous management. Which is hard enough. But you also have an invisible illness—like fibromyalgia, diabetes, Lyme disease, IBS, or something very rare. On the outside, on most days, you look fine, even perfectly healthy. But on the inside, you’re struggling with unbearable migraines, knock-you-off-your-feet fatigue, dangerous digestive issues, severe pain and much more. Because people don’t see these symptoms, they misunderstand what’s going on, which leads you to feel judged and lonely. And these people might include everyone from med...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders General Health-related Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Chronic Illness Chronic Pain Coping Skills Resilience Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, we found that chronic social stress alters the neurobiological response to surgical injury, resulting in slowed recovery. This model maybe useful for future interventional studies examining the mechanistic interactions between depression and risk of CPSP.
Source: Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
ConclusionsOne in five new orthopedic patients reports Anxiety levels that may warrant intervention. This rate is heightened in patients needing spine care. Patient-reported Physical Function more strongly correlates with PROMIS Anxiety than Depression suggesting that the Anxiety CAT is a valuable addition to assess mental health among orthopedic patients.Level of EvidenceDiagnostic level III.
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
In this study, a clinically relevant, induced-LBP paradigm was used to study sensory processing as a risk factor and predictor for LBP development in healthy people. Our aim was to examine sensory processing in those who do develop LBP and those who do not develop LBP with the paradigm, and to examine the relationships between scores on psychosocial questionnaires and sensory processing measures in these healthy people. Methods: A total of 71 participants completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and then took part in quantitative sensory testing. An induced-LBP para...
Source: The Clinical Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
When you’re highly sensitive, being a mom can sharpen your sensitivities. After all, kids are loud and boisterous and messy. Which can be uncomfortable and overwhelming, making the desire to retreat somewhere quiet even more acute and urgent. But, of course, retreating isn’t exactly possible when you’re a parent. In general, when you’ve got kids, there’s very little alone time. And, of course, alone time is vital for highly sensitive people (HSPs) in order to recover and recharge. We are already overstimulated. You also constantly feel like you’re short on time, and there’s always ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Highly Sensitive Person Motherhood Source Type: blogs
“Life is too short to be miserable.” – Rita Mae Brown While it would be wonderful if you never got sick, that’s not life. In fact, you can count on having some bouts of illness no matter how healthy you currently are or have been. There are countless opportunities to encounter germs, carried by people who are infected — even if they don’t look sick — or clinging to surfaces you touch. Allergies afflict millions every day, while family contact and heredity account for many more instances of sickness and illness. When you do fall ill, it may be of short duration or a long and dr...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits Happiness Health-related Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Chronic Pain Cold And Flu Season Common Cold Illness Influenza Self Care self-compassion sickness Source Type: blogs
Gabe Howard’s biggest fear is that his bipolar disorder will get worse. “I’m more worried about the symptoms of bipolar disorder coming back than I am about anything else. Literally anything else. I’ll walk through the streets after midnight in New York City and not be a bit concerned about being attacked — but I’ll be terrified of losing everything to bipolar disorder.” Elaina J. Martin also fears getting sicker. “I worry I will get in a depression so dark I will become suicidal because it has happened before.” She, too, worries about the mania returning. &ld...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Creativity Grief and Loss Peer Support Self-Help Bipolar Disorder bipolar mania Depressive Episode Manic Episode Source Type: blogs
I grabbed a few beach pillows, put on my old worn-out blue beach button down, poured myself a glass of whiskey and walked down to the beach from our villa to watch the sunset. My four friends and I were ten days deep into a two-week vacation. We had already toured Seoul, South Korea for three days, Tokyo, Japan for four days and Hong Kong for three days. So, I welcomed the two days of rest and relaxation that accompanied the beach resort of Vinpearl in Nha Trang, Vietnam. I remember laying down perched up on a pillow or two to support my head. The fine, white sand of Nha Trang starting to stick to my almost empty but still...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study investigates the effects of an 8-week yoga program with educational intervention compared with an informational pamphlet on disability, anxiety, depression, and pain, in people affected by chronic low back pain (CLBP). METHODS: Thirty individuals (age 34.2 ± 4.52 yrs) with CLBP were randomly assigned into a Yoga Group (YG, n = 15) and a Pamphlet Group (PG, n = 15). The YG participated in an 8-week (2 days per week) yoga program which included education on spine anatomy/biomechanics and the management of CLBP. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Monitoring res...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
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